Meet the 2017 Annual Meeting Program Committee Nominee Candidates

Voting for the 2017 ARVO elections is now open through May 7, 2017, 5:30pm U.S. ET.
 
Regular and Life members who paid their dues for the 2017 membership year no later Feb. 20, 2017 should have received an email from BigPulse containing their login information and voting instructions. Voting reminders will be emailed prior to the close of elections. If you have any questions, please email Stephen Willie

Remember that you may only vote for candidates in your scientific section.

AP Section - Anatomy LE Section
Regan Ashby, PhD Michael Wormstone, PhD
AP Section - Pathology Salil Lachke, PhD
Jonathan Kim, MD Sheikh Amer Riazuddin, Ph D
Colleen Cebulla, MD, PhD LV Section
BI Section Nicole Ross, OD, MSc
Astra Dinculescu, PhD MOI Section
Zongchao Han, MD, PhD

CL Section
Richard Rosen, FACS, FASRS, CRA, MD
Hao Zhang, PhD
Stacey Choi, PhD
Gui-shuang Ying, PhD PH Section
Ecosse Lamoureux, MSc, PhD

CO Section - Basic Scientist
Haiyan Gong, MD, PhD
Chi-Wai Do, PhD

Shiva Swamynathan, PhD RC Section
Daniel Gibson, PhD Manuel Vidal-Sanz, MD, PhD, FARVO
CO Section - Clinical Scientist Goldis Malek, PhD
Xiuqian Mu, MD, PhD
Cintia de Paiva, MD, PhD James Fadool, PhD
Francisco Figueiredo, MD, PhD, FRCOphth Michael Zuber, PhD
Wei Li, MD, PhD, Msc RE Section — non U.S.
Thomas Fuchsluger, MD, PhD, FEBO, MSc Mineo Kondo, MD, PhD, FARVO
Pedram Hamrah, MD, FRCS, FARVO Marten Brelen, BMBCh, FRCOphth, PhD
Natasha Frank, MD  Jens Folke Kiilgaard, MD, PhD
Gerald Zaidman, MD  
EY Section RE Section - U.S.
Zia Chaudhuri, MS, DNB, MNAMS, FRCS, FICO Stephen Russell, MD, FARVO
GEN Section VI Section
Yutao Liu, MD, PhD
Subhabrata Chakrabarti, PhD
Shrikant Bharadwaj, PhD
Jennifer Hunter, PhD
GL Section VN Section
Tatjana Jakobs, MD
M. Francesca Cordeiro, MD, PhD
Rafael Grytz, PhD
Jan Kremers, PhD
Chi Luu, PhD
IM Section  
Jennifer Thorne, MD, PhD
Richard Lee, MRCS, MRCOphth, PhD
Jaya Rajaiya, PhD
 
   

2017 AMPC Nominee Candidates

 AP Section - Anatomy

 Regan Ashby, PhD, is an assistant professor in Neurobiology at the University of Canberra (UC), Australia. Regan has been studying ocular development at the anatomical and molecular level for over 12 years during which time he has been an active ARVO member authoring and co-authoring numerous poster and oral presentations. Regan graduated with his PhD in Medical Science from the Australian National University in 2007 studying the early-response gene Egr-1 as a biomarker for myopia development.

After completing his PhD, Regan undertook a two year Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Tuebingen (Germany), as part of the European Union, Marie-Curie European Training Program in Myopia. During this time, Regan investigated the ability of bright light to retard the development of myopia in chickens, and the role of the neurotransmitter dopamine in such protective effects. This work culminated in Regan being awarded the Attempto Prize for Neuroscience, from the University of Tuebingen (Germany) in 2010. Time outdoors and the role of light in the development of myopia have become particularly topical at ARVO in recent years due to the expanding number of clinical trials, epidemiological and animal studies in this area. Regan also has a significant background in the molecular analysis of ocular development, at the level of the genome, epigenome and transcriptome, with much of this work published in the ARVO journal IOVS.

After joining the Faculty at UC in 2011, Regan established his own research group, with the focus of translating animal findings to clinical treatments. Specifically, Regan is trying to understand the biochemical pathways by which bright light prevents the development of experimental myopia, so as to develop pharmacological treatments that can be used in conjunction with increased time outdoors to prevent the onset of myopia. Regan is also investigating the molecular pathways by which current pharmacological treatments (i.e. atropine and pirenzepine) retard the development of myopia so that we may better refine these agents. Finally, Regan’s group is investigating the localisation and role of the ion channels NKCC, NHE, the Maxi K+ in the dynamic changes in choroidal size, associated with rapid fluid movement, seen during alterations in the rate of ocular growth. With his significant background in visual neuroscience, Regan would be delighted to have the opportunity to represent the AP section on the AMPC committee.

Nominated by: Thomas Norton, PhD

 It is my pleasure to nominate Regan Ashby, PhD, to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee as a member of the Anatomy side of the Anatomy-Pathology section of ARVO. Dr. Ashby is currently Assistant Professor of Neurobiology at the University of Canberra (UC), Australia and a long-time ARVO member. Dr. Ashby is a recognized expert in the field of retinal control of refractive development, dopaminergic mechanisms and the role of light levels in preventing myopia, which make him an excellent match to the current needs of the committee. In addition, Dr. Ashby has a broad understanding of the emmetropization mechanism and has substantial experience in understanding the biochemical pathways by which elevated light levels prevent the development of experimental myopia. He serves as a reviewer of manuscripts for numerous journals and as a reviewer of grant applications. He is well-respected and well-liked by his colleagues around the world. He will be a first-rate addition to the committee.

AP Section - Pathology

 Jonathan Kim, MD When I joined the faculty at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) and the University of Southern California (USC) in 2012, it was the culmination of a lifelong aspiration to lead an ocular oncology service with an international reputation for excellence. Since finishing my ophthalmology residency in 1998, I have completed fellowships in oculoplastic surgery at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), neuro-ophthalmology at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (Harvard), and Ocular Oncology at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Prior to joining the faculty at USC, I was the director of oculoplastic surgery and ocular oncology at Stanford Medical Center. My commitment to continued personal and academic growth through education and collaboration with leading institutions has provided me with the background necessary to assume this prestigious position at CHLA/USC. In 2015, I was granted the A. Linn Murphree Chair at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles to support my research efforts in finding new treatment options for retinoblastoma.

Endorsed by: Shahar Frenkel, MD, PhD

I would like to nominate myself for a seat in the AP section of ARVO (Pathology/Oncology). I have been previously nominated for this position and over the past several years have gained additional experience in the field of ocular oncology, both in clinical and basic science research. As the director of an ocular oncology service at a major academic center, I bring extensive clinic experience to the position, as well knowledge of the research landscape for this subspecialty. I am dedicated to advancing the goals of ARVO and supporting efforts to advance research efforts worldwide in the fields of oncology and pathology.

 Colleen Cebulla, MD, PhD, is an associate professor of Ocular Oncology and Vitreoretinal Diseases at The Ohio State University, Havener Eye Institute. Dr. Cebulla received her MD/PhD degrees from the Medical Scientist Training Program at Ohio State University. Her PhD, in experimental pathology, focused on aspects of cytomegalovirus viral immunology. She completed her ophthalmology residency training at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Miami, FL, followed by fellowships in ocular oncology and vitreoretinal surgery at Bascom Palmer. At Ohio State she holds the Torrence A. Makley Research Professorship, directs the Lions-Retina Research Laboratory and is vice chair for research for the Department of Ophthalmology.

Contributions to science include work on retinal detachment-proliferative vitreoretinopathy, uveal melanoma and the BAP1 tumor predisposition syndrome. She is an associate editor for BMC Cancer and an editorial board member in the ocular oncology and pathology committee for the American Academy of Ophthalmology ONE Network. She is a scientific advisor for the Ocular Melanoma Foundation. She was named in Top Cancer Doctors 2015 by Newsweek magazine. She has served as an ad hoc reviewer for the FDA Office of Orphan Products Development. She is a local PI as a tissue source site for the NIH Cancer Genome Atlas Project for uveal melanoma as well as a clinical group member of the analysis and writing groups. She is a member of the International Society of Ocular Oncology and has been a committed AP member of ARVO since 2006.

Nominated by: Abdel Rahman, MD, PhD

It is my pleasure to nominate Colleen M. Cebulla, MD, PhD, to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Anatomy/Pathology (AP) section of ARVO. Dr. Cebulla is currently Associate Professor at the department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, The Ohio State University (OSU). Dr. Cebulla is a physician scientist who is interested in translational research on retinal diseases and ocular oncology. She is board certified ophthalmologist with fellowship training's in ocular oncology and vitreoretinal surgery, both at Bascom Palmer Institute. Since joining the faculty at OSU in 2009 she established two strong research programs one in retinal detachment and proliferative vitreoretinopathy (RD/PVR) and the other one in genetics of uveal melanoma. For RD/PVR she developed mouse and chick animal models which allow analysis of fundamental mechanisms of visual loss and pre-clinical interventions. Her laboratory is currently studying the genomic and proteomic aspects of RD/PVR both in humans and animal models. Her work in uveal melanoma genetics is well recognized nationally and internationally. She is a prominent member of one of the research groups that identified a new hereditary tumor predisposition syndrome caused by germline BAP1 mutation and her publication in the field is very well cited. She currently has 59 publications and many in well-respected journals. She participated in several retina clinical trials and collaborative cancer trials. In addition to being an excellent researcher she is well recognized medical educator. Dr. Cebulla organized our Department’s annual meeting on ocular oncology and uveitis and was on the organizing committee of several other programs. I am confident that she will do a great job making an excellent scientific program. She is fair, well-respected, and well-liked by her colleagues around the world. She will be a first-rate addition to the committee. Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions.

BI Section  

 Astra Dinculescu, PhD, received her PhD in Biochemistry from University of Florida in 2002. She has acquired extensive experience in retinal cell biology during her PhD work on the molecular basis of interaction between visual arrestin and rhodopsin in rod photoreceptor cells.

During her postdoctoral training in a well-established gene therapy laboratory, she studied several mouse models of inherited recessive retinal disorders and successfully developed AAV-based therapies to preserve or restore their retinal function. She has also worked on testing novel capsid-mutant AAV vectors in the retina, and uncovered unique properties, such as increased vector penetration throughout the retinal layers, faster onset of transgene expression, and increased transduction efficiency. She has published a total of 14 peer-reviewed papers over the last six years since the beginning of her faculty appointment as an assistant scientist in 2009.

She has recently become a tenure-track assistant professor in the Department of Ophthalmology in the College of Medicine at the University of Florida. Her laboratory is focused on developing therapeutic approaches for Usher syndrome type III (USH3A), an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in Clarin-1 (CLRN1) gene, leading to progressive retinal degeneration and hearing loss. In addition, she studies the pathological processes affecting the neural retina/retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)/Bruch’s membrane interface, and the mechanisms leading to the formation of drusen in age-related macular degeneration. She developed an interest in complement C1q tumor necrosis factor-related protein-5 (C1QTNF5) following her discovery that mutant S163R C1QTNF5 forms globular aggregates in the RPE, and accumulates as thick, widespread, extracellular RPE basal laminar deposits.

She is currently testing various approaches aimed at preventing the abnormal protein aggregation in RPE, by modulating chaperone expression and targeting the autophagy pathway.

Part of her studies are also focused on MFRP (membrane-type frizzled-related protein), the dicistronic partner of C1QTNF5. The functional relationship between the two proteins is not currently understood. By performing immunostaining with a highly specific antibody, she has shown that MFRP expression is localized not only to the base of the RPE apical membrane, but across the entire length of its apical microvilli. She has a total of 30 publications, including book chapters, a track record which demonstrates her continuous efforts to conduct research and publish her findings.

Endorsed by: Luminita Paraoan, PhD

I would like to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee (BI section of ARVO). I am currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Florida. I have extensive experience as a reviewer of manuscripts, and last year I received the "Exceptionally Good Review" ranking from IOVS.   

I have been an ARVO member since 2002, and I have acquired substantial experience in gene therapy and the biochemistry of the visual system. I am particularly interested in the biochemistry of the RPE cells, the biogenesis of drusen in AMD, and the molecular pathways affecting the neural retina/Retinal pigment epithelium/Bruch's membrane interface.  During the last 14 years, I have collaborated with several leading scientists in the field of retinal and cochlear research at several top universities in the United States and Europe to develop a potential treatment for Usher 3A. In 2016, I was elected to participate in the Alliance for Eye and Vision Research (AEVR) Emerging Vision Scientists Program, which allows scientists to meet with members of Congress to discuss the importance of vision research in the continuing fight to prevent blindness.  

Therefore,  I believe that I could bring a valuable contribution to the committee.  

 Zongchao Han, MD, PhD, received his MD degree from the University of Henan in 1986.He had been working as a neurologist for about 10 years. He earned his master's degree in Neurology from Tongji Medical University in 1999 and his PhD in Neurology from Huazhong University of Science & Technology in 2002, followed by postdoctoral training at the University of Florida. Later he joined the faculty in the Department of Cell Biology at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in 2008. He moved to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill of Department of Ophthalmology in 2014.

Han’s research focus centers on retinal gene/drug delivery using nanoparticles. He has authored and co-authored several widely cited research papers in the area of drug/gene therapy using nanotechnologies. He is a member of Carolina Institute for NanoMedicine, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, and UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Nationally, he is a member of ASGCT and ARVO. He provides ad hoc journal reviews, such as PlOS ONE, Nanomedicine, European J of Pharmaceutical Sciences, for over 15 peer-reviewed journals. In addition to directing an active lab, Han is participating in teaching at UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and is serving as a mentor at UNC Medical Student Research. Han has reviewed grant applications for Fight for Sight (UK, 2013-16), and has authored and co-authored five book chapters and over 40 research papers. The work of the laboratory has been funded by several federal agencies, such as NEI R21, R01, CCNE and NC TraCS.

Nominated by: Marina Gorbatyuk, PhD

I am happy to nominate myself (Zongchao Han) as a potential candidate of this section.

As Assistant Professor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, I provides valuable service to the University. I have held the position of Director of Nano Ophthalmology Research.  I am a mentor at UNC Medical Student Research,participate in teaching at UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, and is currently a mentor to postdocs, research associate, lab assistant, visiting scholars, and PhD student of my own lab. My achievements are upgraded along with the experience and leadership in this worthy University.

The growing research capabilities and collaborative nature of the ARVO Society have helped me gather tremendous knowledge and skills. I am now ready to implement my knowledge and my experience gained over these years to contribute to the success of ARVO community. I believe I will be able to contribute to the ARVO through my enthusiasm and experience. Those who come to work with me find intensity in my commitments and giving to the fullest of my abilities. I thank you for your consideration.

CL Section  

 Gui-shuang Ying, PhD, received an MD in Preventive Medicine and an MPH in Toxicology, both from Zhejiang University, China. He received an MS in biostatistics (Minor in Epidemiology) from the University of Michigan in 2000.

He joined the Department of Ophthalmology of the University of Pennsylvania, as a biostatistician. In 2004, he earned a PhD in Biostatistics from the University of Pennsylvania and was appointed to the faculty. He is currently associate professor of Ophthalmology and an associate scholar in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology.

Ying is a recognized leader and strong collaborator in ophthalmic clinical research, spanning nearly all fields of ophthalmic disease. He has authored or co-authored 205 papers in peer-reviewed journals. Ying has been the principal investigator of the Data Coordinating Center for two multicenter observational studies (Telemedicine Approaches to Evaluating Acute-phase ROP (e-ROP), and Postnatal Growth and the Retinopathy of Prematurity (G-ROP)) and for three secondary data analysis grants from NEI. He has been a senior biostatistician for several NEI multicenter studies including: Comparison of Age-related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT), Vision In Preschoolers (VIP) Study, Retinopathy in Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (RCRIC) study, Systemic Immunosuppressive Therapy for Eye Diseases (SITE), Vision in Preschoolers – Hyperopia in Preschoolers (VIP-HIP) Study, Dry Eye Assessment and Management (DREAM) Study, Developing New Methods for Early Detection of Sjogren’s Syndrome and Plasticity of the Human Visual System in Response to Retinal Gene Therapy. In these studies, Ying’s professional activities extend beyond statistical analysis as he contributes to study design, data collection and management, study operations and writing manuscripts.

Ying directs the Biostatistics Consulting Module of the Vision Core grant, working with clinical researchers and laboratory scientists throughout the Penn vision science community. He contributes to the design of the projects and teaches biostatistical methods and interpretation in his consultations with faculty and students. In addition to the areas noted above, he has collaborated in research in glaucoma and genetic diseases (Leber’s congenital amaurosis, choroideremia).

Ying has been an active participant in ARVO meetings since 2001. He is a regular presenter at ARVO, a moderator of presentation sessions, and an author or co-author of 170+ ARVO abstracts. Ying is mentor for ARVO Global Mentorship Program. As a strong advocator for the appropriate analysis of correlated eye data, Ying was the director and a faculty presenter for the ARVO short course “Analysis of Correlated Eye Data”, and a faculty member for the ARVO Clinical Trials Course in Shanghai.

Ying has considerable expertise in evaluating clinical research. He serves regularly on NEI study sections and is the associate editor for Ophthalmic Epidemiology. He is a frequent reviewer for most of leading journals in ophthalmology and vision science.

With his strong biostatistical expertise and extensive experience, as well as his enthusiasm for ARVO, Ying will be and outstanding contributor to the Annual Meeting Program Committee for Clinical/Epidemiologic Research.

Nominated by: Maureen Maguire, PhD, FARVO

I am delighted to nominate Gui-shuang Ying, PhD, to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Clinical/Epidemiologic Research (CL) section of ARVO. Dr. Ying is currently Associate Professor of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, the University of Pennsylvania and has been an active member of the CL section for more than 15 years.

Dr. Ying is an outstanding biostatistician devoted to ophthalmologic research. He has worked on major clinical research projects addressing important topics including the natural history and treatment of age-related macular degeneration, retinopathy of prematurity, dry eye disease, and preschool vision screening and the impact of refractive error in preschool children. He contributes by not only developing and carrying out state-of-the art statistical analyses, but also, guidance and oversight on study design and implementation.

Dr. Ying directs the Biostatistics Module of the NEI Core grant at Penn and is responsible for overseeing the work of three junior biostatisticians, as well as taking on himself the more challenging projects. While consulting, he takes on a teaching role in explaining the choice of statistical methods and their appropriate interpretation.

Between his work on large multi-center clinical research programs and biostatistical consulting, he has approximately 200 publications. Dr. Ying is a reviewer for several journals devoted to ocular disease and health and is an Associate Editor of Ophthalmic Epidemiology. He has also served regularly on NEI study sections.

Given his broad knowledge of ophthalmology, established expertise in study design, analysis, and interpretation, and his considerable experience in reviewing manuscripts and grant applications, Dr Ying will be an outstanding addition to the CL committee.

  Ecosse Lamoureux, MSc, PhD

Professor Lamoureux’s research achievements include the development and implementation of several randomised control trials; large population-based epidemiology studies; prevention and treatment of ocular conditions and vision impairment; compliance to management of eye diseases; and patient-centred outcomes in Australia, Singapore, and elsewhere. To date, his research activities have attracted over SG$20 million in competitive grant funding. The multi-disciplinary nature of his research programme has mostly been funded by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC); the Australian Research Council (ARC); and the Singapore National Medical Research Council (NMRC), three premier government funding institutions in Australia and Singapore. He has over 320+ publications in the top 5% of the international journals in various disciplines (i.e. ophthalmology, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases). My current H-Index is 42 and i10-index is 148 (Google Scholar Citation: Dec 2016).

Between 2004 and 2013, he has been awarded three consecutive Australian NHMRC competitive career fellowships and last year, he was awarded the NMRC Clinical Scientist Award-Senior (CSA-Sen) in Singapore. He is regularly invited to speak at the top-tier international eye meetings and is a section editor for two international journals in Ophthalmology.  He is a reviewer for multiple peer-reviewed international journals; and national and international research grant funding bodies. He is the supervisor of several postgraduate students. He is a member of the Australian NHMRC Grant Review Panels (Health Services Research & Health Promotion; Indigenous Health) and the Singapore Clinician Scientist-Individual Research Grant (CS-IRG) Local Review Panel.

Nominated by: Lisa Keay, PhD

It is my pleasure to nominate Professor Ecosse Lamoureux, PhD, to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Clinical and Epidemiological section of ARVO.   Dr Lamoureux is Professor at Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore; and the Singapore Eye Research Institute (SERI) and Singapore National Eye Centre (SNEC).  He is a long-time member of the Clinical and Epidemiologic section. 

Prof Lamoureux’s clinical research is focused on the epidemiology; prevention; treatment; compliance to disease management; and clinical outcomes for people with ocular conditions, in particular diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema, and glaucoma, which are leading causes of vision impairment and blindness worldwide. He is also the Director of the Population Research Platform and head of the health services research group at his institution. 

Prof Lamoureux is recognised for the development and implementation of several randomised control trials; large population-based epidemiology studies; prevention and treatment of ocular conditions and vision impairment; compliance to management of eye diseases; and patient-centred outcomes in Australia, Singapore, and elsewhere.  His expertise complements the current expertise of the committee. In particular, Prof Lamoureux has a experience in health services research, a research area which has a growing share of submissions to the CL section at ARVO.  

Prof Lamoureux leads a large group of research staff; postdoctoral and research fellows; clinical trial coordinators; clinicians; and scientists.  He has substantial experience as a reviewer of grant applications and manuscripts and is well-respected and well-liked by his colleagues in this field. I believe that he has the necessary experience expertise to advise on program content at ARVO and broad professional networks to draw on for invited speakers.  

CO Section - Basic Scientist

 Shiva Swamynathan, PhD, received his PhD in 1996 from the Center for Cellular and Molecular Biology (Hyderabad, India) and postdoctoral training from Drs. Guntaka (University of Missouri) and later Joram Piatigorsky (NEI). He served as an NEI staff scientist for two years, and then joined the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine where he runs the Laboratory of Ocular Surface Development and Gene Expression as a tenured associate professor of Ophthalmology and Cell Biology, and member of the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the Fox Center for Vision Restoration. 

Swamynathan is well recognized for his contributions to our understanding of ocular surface development and gene expression. His publications have been widely cited. He was the first to study the corneal function and expression of SLURP1, an immunomodulatory protein abundantly expressed in the cornea and secreted into tear film, and has pioneered research on functions of Krüppel-like factors on the ocular surface. Swamynathan's lab is currently supported by two NIH R01 grants. He is founding director of the 'Biology of Vision' course offered at the University of Pittsburgh since 2008 and mentors postdoctoral fellow, graduate and undergraduate students. He has served on the editorial board of the Journal of Ophthalmology since 2012, and reviews for many journals including Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Development, Molecular and Cellular Biology, Experimental Eye Research, Oncogene, Journal of Cell Science, the Journal of Cell Biology and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (USA). Swamynathan has served as an ad hoc member of the 'Biology of Visual Systems' (BVS) Study Section in 2012, 2014 and 2016 and in 2017 on the special emphasis panel 'Ocular Surface, Cornea, Anterior Segment Glaucoma and Refractive Error'.  

Nominated by: Gordon Laurie, PhD, FARVO

With great enthusiasm, I wish to nominate Shiva Swamynathan, PhD for membership in the AMPC Corneal Section. Shiva is an outstanding corneal basic scientist, formerly an NEI staff scientist and now an Associate Professor and PI in Ophthalmology and Cell Biology at the University of Pittsburgh with two NIH RO1 grants on ocular surface homeostasis. He is a past winner of a NIH K22 Career Development award, and won the 'Best Scientific Paper' award at the 2009 Asia-ARVO meeting. Shiva has served on NEI study sections and on the editorial board of the Journal of Ophthalmology since 2012, and is well known for his work on the immunomodulatory protein SLURP-1 (secreted Ly6/urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor–related protein-1) that he discovered plays an important role in maintaining corneal immune privilege. He is also well-respected for his research on the role of KLF4 (regulates Slurp1 expression) and KLF5 transcription factors in corneal development. His work is beautifully performed, thorough and elegantly addresses mechanism. The quality of his seminar invitations (University of Colorado, Harvard, Jules Stein, Gordon Conference) reflect the strength of peer interest his work. Shiva has been an ARVO member since 2001, and in past ARVO Meetings has served as a Moderator of Corneal Section Sessions: 'Epithelium: Cell Biology and Functions', 'Ocular Development/Stem Cells, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology' and 'Dry Eye Disease'. As a former member of the AMPC Corneal Section, I find Shiva to be a perfect candidate for this position. His love of, and respect for the art of exploring, corneal science is very impressive.

 Daniel Gibson, PhD, has a broad background include a BS in Mechanical Engineering, and MS and PhD degrees in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Gibson’s research experience includes the molecular and cellular regulation of corneal wound healing, the development of point-of-care (POC) biochemical assays, and biomechanics. Gibson’s key contributions to research so far have been to continually improve the understanding of the natural history of corneal opacification after injury and the emerging understanding of identifying and dealing with biological variance and molecular aliasing in wound healing and vision research. Gibson’s efforts to date have resulted in 19 peer-reviewed publications, five awarded utility patents, and three book chapters. In addition to his research activities, Gibson currently serves on the University of Florida’s College of Medicine Research Leadership Group, is a mentor for the undergraduate University Scholars program, and a poster judge for the annual University of Florida’s Celebration of Research. Gibson has provided service to the vision and wound healing community in the form of serving as poster session moderator for at least two annual ARVO meetings, he has reviewed 16 manuscripts from eight different journals, and has now reviewed one Fight for Sight grant in addition to 10 internal grants at the University of Florida.

Nominated by: Gregory Schultz, PhD

It is my pleasure to nominate Dr. Daniel J. Gibson, Ph.D.,to serve as a Basic Scientist on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Cornea section of ARVO.  Dr. Gibson is currently an Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology and Wound Healing at the University of Florida.  Dr. Gibson is a recognized expert in the fields of corneal wound healing, point-of-care assays,and biomechanics, which make him an excellent match to the current needs of the committee. In addition, Dr. Gibson has a broad understanding of the cornea and ocular surface and has substantial experience as a reviewer of grant applications and manuscripts. He is well-respected and well-liked by his colleagues around the world and would be a terrific addition to the Cornea section of the AMPC committee.

CO Section - Clinical Scientist 

 Cintia de Paiva, MD, PhD, received her medical degree from the State University of Campinas Medical School SP, Brazil, at which she subsequently completed an internship, two years of residency training in ophthalmology, and one year of fellowship training in cornea and external disease. She joined the Department of Ophthalmology as a research fellow in March, 2001, was appointed assistant professor of ophthalmology (non-tenure track) in 2008 and promoted to assistant professor of ophthalmology (tenure track) in 2011.

de Paiva earned a PhD from the University of Sao Paulo Ribeirao Preto in October 2015. She has been extremely productive having published more than 90 peer-reviewed manuscripts in prominent journals and five book chapters. She received a Fight for Sight Fellowship Grant in 2003, National Eye Research Training in Visual Science Award in 2004, National Eye Institute Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Fellowship Award in 2005, and Fight for Sight Grant-in-Aid Award in 2008 and a John Hartford Foundation Excellence in Geriatrics Award in 2008, a Lions Foundation for Sight research award in 2010 and a Biology of Inflammation Center research award in 2013. She received four travel awards, two from the Tear Film and Ocular Surface Society and another one from the National Eye Institute to present her findings at ARVO and one to present her findings at the 28th Biennial Boston Cornea Conference in 2013. Her innovative work about IL-17 disrupting corneal barrier in dry eye published in Mucosal Immunology in 2009 was one of the top ten downloaded articles from the journal, which belongs to the Nature family and it has been cited more than 190 times.

This work received the ARVO/AFER Award in the immunology category by the Association Research and Vision in Ophthalmology in 2011 during the ARVO Annual Meeting. de Paiva received an award from Department of Defense in 2011 to investigate novel drug delivery systems in ocular burns. She is an associate editor for Arquivos Brasileiros de Oftalmologia and she also belongs to the editorial board of Scientific Reports. She has served as ad hoc member in NIH review study sections and it is the current president of the International Ocular Surface Society.

Nominated by: De-Quan Li, MD, PhD

It is my great pleasure to nominate Dr. de Paiva for the 2017 AMPC Call for Nominations for the Cornea Section. Dr. de Paiva is currently an Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the Baylor College of Medicine and has been a member and active contributor to the cornea section of ARVO for 14 years. She maintains an exciting research program studying ocular surface mucosal immunology and the effects of desiccation and dysbiosis on the pathogenesis of ocular surface disease. Her research has led to major advances in understanding the pathogenesis and treatment of dry eye disease. Dr. de Paiva is an active member of the research community, serving as President of the International Ocular Surface Society, a co-chair of the DEWS II committee Pathophysiology, Associate Editor for Arquivos Brasileiros de Oftalmologia, editorial board member of Scientific Reports and frequent and respected reviewer for a number of high impact ophthalmology and scientific journals. Additionally, she has served as mentor to a number of medical students and postdoctoral fellows. She has wide-ranging experience and knowledge of immunology and molecular and cell biology. She has established a number of collaborations with respected scientists. These attributes make her an excellent match to satisfy the current needs of critical and objective evaluation of both basic science and clinical abstracts. I can’t think of a more qualified candidate, and I know she will be a first-rate addition to the committee. 

 Francisco Figueiredo, MD, PhD, FRCOphth is professor of ophthalmology in the Department of Ophthalmology at the Royal Victoria Infirmary (RVI, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom) and Institute of Genetic Medicine (IGM), University of Newcastle.

Figueiredo received his MDdegree from the Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil in 1981 and his PhD from Bristol University, UK in 1996. He joined the faculty in the Department of Ophthalmology at the Royal Victoria Infirmary and Newcastle University in 1997 where he established a comprehensive corneal and external eye disease service and research program. Since then he has been the director of the service, which embraces the corneal, amniotic membrane and limbal stem cell transplantation services. He has more than 30 years' experience in the field of ophthalmology, in particular in ocular surface diseases. He has performed in excess of 1,250 corneal transplantations and more than 50 limbal stem cell transplants. Figueiredo co-founded the Bowman Club (UK Cornea Society) in 1998 and is the current secretary. He was president of MCLOSA (British Ocular Surface Society; 2012 - 14) and was appointed member of the ODISSEY European Consensus Group on dry eye disease in 2014. He was Chairman of the Ocular Tissue Transplantation Standards Group, Royal College of Ophthalmologists, London (2004-13). He was also a member of the Ocular Tissue Advisory Group (1999-2013) and is a member of the Eye Bank Advisory Group since 2013, both part of UK NHS Blood and Transplant. Figueiredo established the Limbal Stem Cell Research group at IGM, Newcastle University in 2003 determined to develop an animal free limbal stem cell therapy programme and successfully transplanted the first patient in 2006. He was the Designated Individual (2006 - 08) for the Human Tissue Authority UK license in the above LSC project (currently part of a corporate license for the whole Newcastle NHS Trust).

The focus of his lab based limbal stem cell research has been on the understanding of limbal stem cell function, role of inflammation on its damage and developing a GMP certified animal free culture system. The lab-based research has been complemented by a phase I and II clinical trials on ex vivo expanded autologous limbal stem cell transplantation to treat patients with unilateral limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) and a “proof of concept” clinical trial using autologous oral mucosa stem cell transplantation to treat patients with bilateral LSCD. Figueiredo has co-authored several widely cited papers mainly in the field of limbal stem cell research and translation. He has received grants from the MRC UK and NIHR UK, among others as PI totaling in excess of £2.6 million. Current research interests are in the field of limbal stem cell research and translation, dry eye burden of disease and health-related quality of life and patient-reported outcomes, keratoconus disease mechanism and development of potential new treatments and corneal transplantation outcomes.

Nominated by: Che Connon, PhD

It is my pleasure to nominate Francisco Figueiredo, MD PhD  to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Corneal section of ARVO as Clinician Scientist. 

Dr. Figueiredo is currently Professor of Ophthalmology at Newcastle University and Director of Corneal Service, Department of Ophthalmology at the Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.

Professor Figueiredo is a hugely experienced corneal surgeon and recognised expert in limbal stem cell transplantation having developed an animal free autologous serum limbal stem cell culture method. He also has broad knowledge of corneal diseases at both a clinical and basic level and numerous international collaborators. 

As a long-time member of the Corneal section combined with his extensive experience on academic and clinical boards as well as grant/paper reviewing I believe Prof. Figueirdo would make an excellent member of the committee.

 Wei Li, MD, PhD, Msc, received his degrees from Wannan Medical College in 1994, and Tongji Medical University in 1999. He conducted his postdoctoral research in Ocular Surface Center (Miami, Florida) from 2003 to 2007. He currently serves as professor of ophthalmology, director of the Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Science of Medical College of Xiamen University, deputy director of the Eye Institute of Xiamen University. He also works as a cornea and ocular surface disease specialist in Xiamen University affiliated Xiamen Eye Center. Li focuses his basic research on corneal limbal stem cell and the mechanism of ocular surface diseases, and clinic research on ocular surface reconstruction. He has published more than 50 papers on peer-reviewed journals such as IOVS, Stem Cells, J Pathol, Cell Res, J Biol Chem, Am J Physiol, Am J and Pathol. He is now youth committee member of Chinese Ophthalmology Society, board member of Basic Research Development Committee of Chinese Ophthalmology Society, committee member of Chinese Cornea Society, committee member of Asia Dry Eye Society and Chinese Dry Eye Society, member of Asia Cornea Society. He is communication editor of Chinese Journal of Ophthalmology, academic editor of PLOS ONE, reviewer of National Natural Science Foundation of China.

Nominated by: Scheffer Tseng, MD, PhD

It is my pleasure and honor to nominate Wei Li, M.D., M.Sc., to server the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Cornea Section of ARVO. Dr. Li is currently Professor of Ophthalmology, Director of the Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Science of Medical College of Xiamen University, deputy director of the Eye Institute of Xiamen University. He is a physician scientist with strong devotion and commitment to corneal basic and clinical research as exemplified by his many publications in this area as well as his success in bringing up a number of young scientists through their Key Laboratory in China. His research interest and influence to the next generation make him an excellent match to this post. In addition, he is well-respected and well-liked by his peers around the world. He will be an excellent candidate to help promote the meeting program in the future.

 Thomas Fuchsluger, MD, PhD, FEBO, MSc, is the appointed university professor for cornea and the anterior ocular segment at the Department of Ophthalmology, Friedrich-Alexander-University, Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany. He is head of the Erlangen Cornea Bank and head of the Cornea Laboratory focusing on corneal endothelium and tissue engineering.

He completed his medical education at Ulm University, Germany, after several internships abroad (e.g. Singapore General Hospital, Queen Mary’s Hospital London, University Hospital Buenos Aires) and performed his residency and further ophthalmological training at the Center for Ophthalmology, Essen University Hospital, Germany. In 2006, he was a visiting fellow at the Dept. of Ophthalmology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine. From 2008 until 2010 he performed a postdoctoral fellowship at Schepens Eye Research Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston Mass., , working on gene and cell therapy approaches to protect the corneal endothelium. After his return to Germany he accepted a consultant and faculty position at the Dept. of Ophthalmology, Dusseldorf University Hospital where he served as head of the Lions Eye Bank North Rhine-Westphalia. In 2014 he was appointed university professor at Friedrich-Alexander-University, Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany.

Fuchsluger published in renowned peer-reviewed journals not only in the field of ophthalmology but also in gene and cell therapy, as well as in in biomaterial journals, such as Human Gene Therapy, Gene Therapy, Nanomedicine and Acta Biomaterialia. Besides having published review articles, he also was co-author of book chapters on corneal transplantation and biosynthetic corneas (e.g. in Copeland and Afshari’s “Principles and Practice of CORNEA”, Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers, 2013). He has delivered numerous invited talks and has been a recipient of several merit, research or best paper awards (e.g. Young Investigator Merit Award, Tear Film & Ocular Surface Society; Best Paper Award of the European Eye Bank Association).

He currently serves as section editor for the British Journal of Ophthalmology and as associate editor for Acta Ophthalmologica and for the Journal of EuCornea. In addition, he is reviewer for several research councils, amongst them Medical Research Council (UK), Fight for Sight (UK), DLR (Germany). He performs ad hoc reviewer services for currently 16 peer-reviewed journals.

Fuchsluger is the vice president-elect of the European Association for Vision and Eye Research (EVER) after finishing his function as chair of EVER Section “Cornea and Ocular Surface” from 2012 - 2017. Furthermore, he was elected in 2015 as member of the Annual Meeting Program Committee, Cross-sectional Group Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine of ARVO. For ARVO, he contributed as member of the Members-in-Training Committee (2009 - 2012) and was appointed as member of the Publications Committee (2015 - 2018).

Nominated by: Reza Dana, MSc, MPH, MD, FARVO

I am very pleased to nominate Dr. Thomas A. Fuchsluger for the AMPC, Cornea section. Thomas Fuchsluger MD, PhD, FEBO, MSc is the appointed University Professor for Cornea at the Department of Ophthalmology, Friedrich-Alexander-University, Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany. He is Head of the Erlangen Cornea Bank and Head of the Cornea Laboratory focusing on corneal endothelium and tissue engineering.

Thomas has been an ARVO member since the early 2000s, contributed from 2009 until 2012 as member of the Members-in-Training Committee. In this function, he co-organized workshops and also acted as speaker. Thomas is an alumnus of the postdoctoral research program at the Schepens Eye Research Institute, Harvard Medical School (2008-2010). He has consistently remained active in committee work at ARVO: In 2015 he was appointed as member of the “Publications Committee” (2015-2018) and elected as a member for the “Cross-sectional Group Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine” (2015-2016).

Thomas is also the Vice President Elect of EVER after finishing his function as Chair of EVER Section “Cornea and Ocular Surface” from 2012-2017. He is actively involved in annual meeting program duties with the German Ophthalmological Society (DOG). He has published in renowned peer-reviewed journals not only in the field of ophthalmology but also in gene and cell therapy such as in Human Gene Therapy, Gene Therapy, and Nanomedicine. He has delivered numerous invited talks and has been recipient of several merit, research or best paper awards. He currently serves as Section Editor for the British Journal of Ophthalmology and as Associate Editor for Acta Ophthalmologica and for the Journal of EuCornea. In addition, he is reviewer for several research councils, amongst the Medical Research Council (UK), Fight for Sight (UK), DLR (Germany). 

For all these reasons I highly recommend him as AMPC for Cornea with no reservations.

 Pedram Hamrah, MD, FRCS, FARVO, is a NIH-funded clinician-scientist with a focus on corneal immunology, ocular imaging (immuno-imaging), and ocular surface disease. He received his medical degree from the University of Cologne in Germany, and performed his residency in Oophthalmology at the University of Louisville, where he was elected chief resident during his last year. He has completed fellowships in Ocular and Transplantation Immunology at the Schepens Eye Research Institute, and in Ocular Immunology at the University of Louisville, as well as a two-year clinical fellowship in Cornea, External Diseases and Refractive Surgery at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. He is currently on faculty at the Department of Ophthalmology at Tufts University School of Medicine, were he is the director of the Center for Translational Ocular Immunology. In addition, he is a faculty member at the immunology, neuroscience, and cell, molecular and developmental biology graduate programs at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts. Throughout his career, he has focused on discovery, patient care and teaching.

Hamrah has been directing both strong laboratory science and prolific clinical research programs, currently holding three NIH grant awards, in addition to numerous foundation and industry grants. He has previously completed a mentored NIH K08 clinician-scientist development award as well as an RPB Career Development Award. Prior to joining Tufts, he was on faculty at the Cornea Service of the Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School for seven years, where he was also the founder and director of the Ocular Surface Imaging Center. His research is focused on neuro-immune interactions and immune cell trafficking in immune and infectious diseases of the cornea, corneal neuropathic pain, corneal transplantation tolerance and rejection, as well as neurotrophic keratopathy. His clinical focus is on clinical and surgical ocular surface diseases and corneal neuropathic pain.

Hamrah has trained numerous laboratory and translational research fellows, thirteen of whom now hold faculty positions at various major universities throughout the world. He has been an instructor in teaching advanced corneal surgery, management of dry eye disease, management of meibomian gland dysfunction and in vivo confocal microscopy at the American Academy of Ophthalmology and was awarded the Achievement award by the AAO. He currently serves on a dozen editorial boards, is the section editor for The Ocular Surface and Eye and assistant editor at Ocular Immunology and Inflammation. Further, he is ad hoc reviewer for over 50 journals and a regular grant reviewer for the National Eye Institute, FDA, US Army and numerous national and international foundations.

Finally, Hamrah has been continuously serving on the Members-in-Training, Professional Development and Education and the Ethics and Regulations in Human Research Committees at ARVO since 2003 and is currently an ARVO Gold Fellow.

Nominated by: Kazou Tsubota, MD, PhD

It is with the highest enthusiasm that I nominate Pedram Hamrah, MD, FARVO to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Cornea Section Clinician-Scientist seat of ARVO. Dr. Hamrah is currently Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at Tufts University School of Medicine and a member of the Cornea and Immunology sections since 1999. Pedram, a true clinician scientist, has an outstanding record of achievement in both clinical and basic science research. Pedram is a recognized expert in the fields of corneal imaging, clinical and surgical ocular surface diseases, and corneal immunology, making him an excellent match to the current needs of the committee. As a postdoctoral fellow, he discovered that bone marrow-derived cells, including dendritic cells reside in the normal cornea. These observations, now widely referenced, refute a tenet that existed in the cornea literature, namely that the cornea is immune-privileged due to lack of bone marrow-derived cells, and have led to a paradigm shift. He went onto identify the trafficking mechanisms of these cells over the past year and is currently studying the interaction of these cells with the peripheral nervous system in the cornea. In addition, he has a large clinical research group,focusing on studies by in vivo confocal microscopy, studying immune and nerve alterations in the cornea of patients with ocular surface and infectious diseases, and in corneal neuropathic pain. With his broad depth on knowledge and in experience in clinical cornea, clinical research and basic science research he has substantial experience as a section editor on several journals and reviewer of grant applications and manuscripts. Pedram is respected and well-liked by his colleagues around the world, has unique skills and qualifications that would complement current AMPC members in the CO section,and I am delighted to nominate him as a most worthy candidate. 

 Natasha Frank, MD, received an MD from Bogomolets National Medical University, Kiev, Ukraine. She completed a residency in Internal Medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York and a fellowship in Medical Genetics at Harvard Medical School, followed by research training in Genetics and Stem Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children's Hospital. She is currently an assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Genetics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and a principal investigator and director of Genetic Clinic at the VA Boston Medical Center. Frank serves as an associate member of Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and an affiliate member of Harvard Stem Cell Institute, and is a member of the Brigham Genomic Medicine, an integrated clinical and research program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital utilizing genome sequencing for genetic diagnosis and gene discovery.

Frank’s laboratory research explores the biology of stem cells and their roles in physiologic organogenesis and repair, with the ultimate goal of developing novel stem cell-targeted strategies in the fields of tissue regeneration. Frank originally cloned and characterized the novel ATP-binding cassette transporter, ABCB5, and showed that this plasma membrane-expressed P-glycoprotein homologue functions in self-renewal and maintenance of slow-cycling adult stem cells, through stabilization of p53 and regulation of anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. In the mammalian eye, ABCB5 is essential for corneal development and repair through regulation of limbal stem cell (LSC) maintenance and survival (Ksander et al. Nature 2014). Importantly, Frank’s laboratory also showed that purified ABCB5-positive LSC grafts are capable of fully restoring the cornea in preclinical models of limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD), providing a clear rationale for clinical transplantation trials involving this stem cell population to improve therapy for LSCD and potentially additional corneal disorders.

During her academic career, Frank served in various leadership positions as director of Combined Medicine-Genetics Residency Training Program, Brigham and Women's Hospital and interim clinical chief of the Division of Genetics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She is currently an ad hoc member of the Department of Veterans Affairs Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development Services Scientific Merit Review Board and the Fight for Sight Grants Committee. Frank is a recipient of various awards, including K08 Mentored-Clinical Scientist Development Award from NIH, Stem Cell Day Award from Children's Hospital Boston, and Harvard Stem Cell Institute Seed Grant Award. She is a Fellow of the American College of Medical Genetics and elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation.

Nominated by: Bruce Ksander, PhD, FARVO

It is my pleasure and honor to nominate Natasha Frank, MD, to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Cornea section of ARVO. Dr. Frank is currently an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Genetics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and a Principal Investigator and Director of the Genetic Clinic at the VA Boston Medical Center. In addition, she serves as an Associate Member of the Broad Institute of MIT / Harvard and is an Affiliate Member of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute. Dr. Frank is an expert in the field of limbal stem cell biology, tissue regeneration, and epithelial cell biology, which makes her an excellent match to the current needs of the committee. In addition, she has a broad understanding of genetics, cellular and molecular biology and has substantial experience as an excellent reviewer of grant applications and manuscripts. She is well-respected and well-liked by her colleagues. I personally know Natasha to be a fair and honest reviewer and outstanding scientist, who I believe will be an excellent addition to the committee.

 Gerald Zaidman, MD  I am currently professor of Clinical Ophthalmology, Director of the Cornea Service, and Vice Chairman and Director of the Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Westchester Medical Center. I graduated from the Albert Einstein College in Medicine in 1975 and did an ophthalmology residency at Lenox Hill Hospital. I then did my corneal fellowship at the Eye and Ear Hospital, University of Pittsburgh under Dr. Stuart Brown and Dr. Bartly Mondino. Following my fellowship, I lived and practiced in Richmond, Virginia, as an Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology and co-directed the Cornea Service at the Medical College of Virginia affiliated hospitals. I was also Director of Ophthalmology at the McGuire VA Hospital. I have published over 50 peer reviewed articles and presented at numerous meetings as a lecturer on issues pertaining to cornea and external diseases, keratorefractive surgery, and pediatric corneal diseases. I received both an honor award and a senior honor award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology. I received seven research grants. I have travelled to many regions of the United States, Europe, and Asia as a guest lecturer. I have extensive experience in laser vision correction, corneal transplant surgery especially pediatric corneal transplant surgery, and lectured at and moderated many national eye meetings. I am a reviewer for all the major journals in ophthalmology and I have been on the editorial board of several ophthalmology journals. I am founder and president of the Pediatric Keratoplasty Association.

Endorsed by: Bartly Mondino, MD

I, Gerald W. Zaidman, nominate myself for the Clinician Scientist seat on the Cornea Section for ARVO. I have been a practicing corneal specialist for almost 30 years. During that time, I have examined and treated an entire textbook of corneal diseases. I have been a reviewer for a number of Ophthalmology and Cornea journals and have done substantial research in various corneal diseases. This breadth of experience qualifies me to serve on the committee. I am also the founder nad President of the Pediatric Keratoplasty Association, which is dedicated to improving our understanding and management of pediatric corneal diseases.

EY Section  

 Zia Chaudhuri, MS, DNB, MNAMS, FRCS (Glasg), FICO, is working as a professor of ophthalmology at Lady Hardinge Medical College, University of Delhi and PGIMER, Dr RML Hospital at New Delhi, India. She has trained in strabismus and neuro-ophthalmology at the Dr. R. P. Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, India, one of the largest tertiary eye-care centre in northern India, where she also worked as principal investigator (PI) of her first research project on the epidemiology of amblyopia in the Indian population. Subsequently, she continued training in strabismus and neuro-ophthalmology, with special emphasis on nystagmus at the Leicester Royal Infirmary, University of Leicester, United Kingdom under the supervision of Professor and ARVO Trustee Irene Gottlob with support from an International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO) Fellowship. She has also trained in strabismus and neuro-ophthalmology at the Department of Ophthalmology at the Justus-Liebig University at Giessen, Germany, supervised by Professor(s) Birgit Lorenz and Michael H. Graf. She is a certified trainer in pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus under the National programme for Control of Blindness (NPCB), Government of India (GOI).

Chaudhuri was awarded the BOYSCAST Fellowship of the Department of Science and Technology (DST), GOI for undertaking training in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in strabismus at the Department of Ophthalmology, Stein Eye Institute, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), USA under the supervision of Dr. Joseph L Demer and has been an International Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus Fellow at JSEI, UCLA. Her research work on neuro-anatomical strabismus under Joseph Demer’s supervision has been instrumental in the establishment of an acute geriatric strabismus syndrome occurring due to age-related involutional changes in the orbital connective tissues, called the sagging eye syndrome (SES). Currently, she is the Indian PI of a NIH-Department of Biotechnology, Indo-US project on “Effect of Cranial Surgery on Strabismus in Craniosynostosis” with Joseph Demer as the US PI.

Chaudhuri is affiliated with the University of Delhi. She has 14 years of experience in teaching undergraduate and postgraduate students in ophthalmology and has supervised five MD thesis projects (through the University of Delhi). She is currently enrolled for a part-time PhD in genetics under the University of Delhi on “Genetics of Strabismus and Intellectual Disability.”

Chaudhuri has authored three educational textbooks in ophthalmology, has 54 indexed research publications, 58 book chapters, and 40 other scientific articles to her credit. She has received multiple scientific awards by the All India Ophthalmological Society in 2006 and 2016, the Asia-ARVO in 2013, the SOE in 2015 and the AAPOS in 2012. She was awarded the Best International Fellow Award by Stein Eye Institute, UCLA in 2012. Chaudhuri is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, a member of the National Academy of Medical Sciences, India, and of many reputed scientific bodies and ophthalmic societies. She is on the editorial board of the journal Strabismus and the reviewing panel of many reputed peer-reviewed indexed journals in ophthalmology. 

Nominated by: Joseph Demer, MD, PhD, FARVO

I am pleased to nominate for membership on the ARVO Annual Meeting Program Committee, Section EU, Dr. Zia Chaudhuri, MS, DNB, MNAMS, FRCS (Glasg). Dr. Chaudhuri is expert in all of the subject matter of the EY section. Sne is Professor of Ophthalmology at Lady Hardinge Medical College, University of Delhi, India. She trained in strabismus and neuro-ophthalmology at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, where she was PI of an epidemiological study of amblyopia in India. She continued training in strabismus and neuro-ophthalmology, with special emphasis on nystagmus, with Professor Irene Gottlob, and with Professor Birgit Lorenz and Michael Graf. Dr. Chaudhuri trained in magnetic resonance imaging in strabismus at the Stein Eye Institute, University of California Los, Angeles, under Professor Joseph L. Demer. Her collaboration on neuro-anatomical strabismus with Joseph Demer has been instrumental in establishment of the sagging eye syndrome. Currently, Dr. Chaudhuri is Indian PI of a NIH-Department of Biotechnology, Indo-US project on “Effect of Cranial Surgery on Strabismus in Craniosynostosis.” Dr. Chaudhuri has 14 years of experience teaching students in ophthalmology and supervised five MD thesis projects. She is currently completing her own PhD in genetics at the University of Delhi. Dr. Chaudhuri has authored 3 major textbooks in ophthalmology, has 54 indexed research publications, 58 book chapters, and 40 other scientific articles to her credit. She has received scientific awards from the All India Ophthalmological Society in 2006 and 2016, Asia-ARVO in 2013, the European Society of Ophthalmology in 2015, and AAPOS in 2012. Dr. Chaudhuri is Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, and member of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of India. She serves on the editorial board of the journal “Strabismus” and reviews for many journals in ophthalmology.

GEN Section 

 Yutao Liu, MD, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy, Medical College of Georgia (MCG), Augusta University, Augusta, GA. He is a human molecular geneticist studying human genetic disorders using comprehensive genomic and genetic approaches. His genetics research, focused on glaucoma and keratoconus, is supported by NIH/NEI and private foundations. Since 2010, he has been an active co-investigator of the NEIGHBOR and NEIGHBORHOOD (National Eye Institute Glaucoma Human Genetics Collaboration Heritable Overall Operational Database) consortia. He has published over 80 peer-reviewed papers in Nature Genetics, PLOS Genetics, American Journal of Human Genetics, PNAS, IOVS, and other journals. He has extensive expertise with different genetic and genomic technologies, including genetic linkage, candidate and genome-wide association, fine-mapping, gene expression profiling, next-gen sequencing (whole exome/genome sequencing, RNA-Seq, miRNA-Seq), and related statistical and bioinformatics analysis. He was the director of the Molecular Genomics Core at Duke Center for Human Genetics from 2010 to 2014.

Liu received his MD from Beijing Medical University and PhD from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville-Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the program of Genome Science and Technology. After a four-year successful postdoctoral training at Duke, he was promoted to assistant professor of medicine and ophthalmology at Duke University Medical Center in 2010. In 2014 he relocated to the Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy at MCG to continue his glaucoma and keratoconus research. He remains as an adjunct assistant professor of medicine at Duke University School of Medicine.

Liu has been an ARVO member since 2007 and has enjoyed presenting his genetics research multiple times at the Annual Meeting. As a member of the ARVO Members-In-Training Committee (2010 - 2013), he has worked closely with Dr. Marc Kantorow and ARVO staff to organize and expand the annual event “Pizza with the Expert.” Since then, he has enjoyed continuous volunteering service at ARVO, including 1) a member of the Member Communications Working Group (MCWG) (2013 - 2014), 2) a member of the Funding Guide Working Group of ARVO (2014), 3) a member of the ARVOConnect Champions in 2015, 4) and a member of the Most Valuable Connectors (2015 - 2016). He is a current member of the ARVO Ethics and Regulations in Human Research Committee (ERHR) (2016 - 2019). This year, along with Dr’s. Susan Vitale and Yossi Mandel, he has organized a special ERHR workshop titled with “Vulnerable populations in medical research: Ethical dilemmas and practical” on May 10, 2017. He has reviewed manuscripts for more than 47 different journals, including JAMA, Nature Communication, IOVS, Molecular Vision, Experimental Eye Research and others. He has also served as ad hoc grant reviewer for many private, state, federal government and international funding agencies.

Liu fully understands the responsibilities of being an AMPC member at ARVO. His continuous service to ARVO and his broad genetics/genomics/epigenetics research experience provide the necessary skills for this position as an AMPC member in the GEN cross-sectional group.

Nominated by: R. Rand Allingham, MD

I am pleased to enthusiastically nominate Yutao Liu, MD, PhD, to serve on the GEN cross section group of ARVO on the Annual Meeting Program Committee. Dr. Liu is Associate Professor in Cellular Biology and Anatomy at Medical College of Georgia of Augusta University in Augusta, Georgia. He has served on the ARVO Members-In-Training (MIT) Committee (2010-2013) and is currently a member of the ARVO Ethics and Regulation in Human Research Committee (ERHR) (2016-2019).Dr. Liu is a nationally recognized expert in the field of genetics. His long-standing research focus is the genetic investigation of complex inherited disorders with a particular interest in glaucoma and keratoconus. He has extensive research experience in the area of human genetics, bioinformatics, and functional genomics. His research approach involves use of human samples, in vitro cell/tissue culture and mouse models. His broad experience is ideally suited to his role as a member of the GEN cross-sectional group.

 Subhabrata Chakrabarti, PhD, is a genome biologist and the associate director of research at the L.V. Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI) in Hyderabad, India. He has a master’s degree in Biological Anthropology (Calcutta University) and PhD in Human Molecular Genetics (Centre for Genetic Disorders) from India and a brief postdoctoral training at the National Eye Institute, NIH. His laboratory has been involved in understanding the genomics of various complex ocular diseases, with primary focus in glaucoma.

His research on the functional genomics of primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is pioneering in the field that have provided some important molecular insights. He was the first to report a digenic involvement of myocilin (MYOC, involved in POAG) and FOXC1 (a transcription factor) with CYP1B1 in PCG, and convincingly demonstrated a strong geographical clustering of mutations by haplotype backgrounds, which could be useful for predictive testing. Further, he was able to demonstrate the functional basis of CYP1B1 in PCG along with genotype-phenotype correlations in a large cohort.

His ongoing research on exome sequencing in PCG has provided additional insights into the involvement of cilia in disease pathogenesis. Currently, he is also involved in the clinical genetic characterization of a longitudinal cohort (Andhra Pradesh Eye Disease Study or APEDS) that is being followed up for the last 20 years. The main emphasis lies in identifying risk factors for mortality, age-related ocular changes and their underlying molecular basis that would provide means for predictive testing in populations. Most of these studies have an overarching component of translation from bench to bedside. These works have been widely recognized through several honors and awards; notable among them being the Research Recognition Award of the World Glaucoma Association (WGA), Affiliateship of all the three Science Academies of India (INSA, IASc and NASI) and also The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS) and membership to the prestigious GRC (Guha Research Conference). Professionally, he is on the Strategic Planning, Research Training and Professional Development and Education Committees of ARVO, co-chair of the Associate Advisory Board of the WGA, vice president of the Asian Eye Genetics Consortium and executive council member of the Indian Society of Human Genetics.

He has been published widely in reputed journals and has secured extramural grants from within and outside India. He is on the editorial boards of Translational Vision Science & Technology (TVST), Molecular Vision, Journal of Glaucoma and International Glaucoma Review and a reviewer for several other international journals and funding agencies. He is a doctoral supervisor for various universities in India and abroad and regularly supervises PhD candidates and post-doctoral fellows. He also serves on the Ethics Committee of the Institutional Review Board of LVPEI. He was a key organizer of the successful Asia-ARVO held in India (2009 and 2013). Thus, Chakrabarti's professional training, scientific activities, international achievements and his organizational skills make him aptly suitable for a member of the ARVO Annual Meeting Program Committee.

Nominated by. R. Rand Allingham, MD

It is my pleasure to nominate Subhabrata Chakrabarti, PhD, to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Genetics cross-section group of ARVO.  Dr. Chakrabarti is currently the Associate Director of Research at the L.V. Prasad Eye Institute in India.  He has major research interests in understanding the molecular pathogenesis underlying complex diseases like the primary glaucomas and AMD.  He has made important contributions in understanding the functional genomic basis of glaucomas, including the implication of the candidate genes in humans.  He leads an active and productive research group consisting of scientists and clinical collaborators within and outside India,. He has excellent expertise in the areas of functional genomics, genotype-phenotype correlations, statistical analysis and epidemiology that make him an excellent candidate for this position.  He has published widely and is well-supported by various competitive extramural research grants from international and national funding agencies.  He is currently the co-chair of the Associate Advisory Board of World Glaucoma Association and on Editorial Boards of the TVST, Molecular Vision, Journal of Glaucoma and the International Glaucoma Review.  I feel that Dr. Chakrabarti’s scientific expertise and global perspective would complement Drs. Vithana and Jin in the program committee.

GL Section 

 Tatjana Jakobs, MD In 1995, I obtained an MD at the University of Wuerzburg/Germany. My dissertation concerned the biochemical characterization of the Interleukin-2 receptor heavy chain. After this, I joined the Clinical Research Group of the Medical Policlinic of the University of Wuerzburg to do research on thyroid hormone metabolism. This work was awarded the First European von Basedow Research Prize in 1996. I received a two-year scholarship from the Japan Academy for the Promotion of Sciences, and between November 1997 and December 1999, I went to the Department of Human Genetics at the University of Nagasaki, to participate in a positional cloning project.

In March 2000, I joined the laboratory of Prof. Richard Masland at Massachusetts General Hospital to work on projects concerning retinal anatomy, gene expression in single retinal neurons, and, especially, glaucoma. The research on glaucoma was done in collaboration with the laboratory of Dr. Simon John at the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor. We found that ganglion cells degenerated in radial, fan-shaped sectors that had the narrowest point at the optic nerve head. This topology of ganglion cell degeneration is difficult to explain by any other mechanism than a focal insult to neighboring axons in the optic nerve. We, therefor, turned our attention to the glial cells of the optic nerve.

Currently at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary/Schepens Eye Research Institute, my laboratory is studying the role of optic nerve glia in the progression of glaucoma. We have used transgenic animals and immunohistochemistry to visualize the anatomy of the optic nerve glia and ganglion cell axons under normal conditions and in glaucoma. Then we characterized molecular changes in reactive astrocytes by microarray screening. We have identified several pathways that are activated in reactive optic nerve astrocytes and may be targets for therapeutic intervention. We are currently exploring several of them (e.g. the TGFbeta1 and STAT3 pathways). In addition, we have recently started a project to understand why genetic variants that have been associated with glaucoma in genome-wide association studies have this effect. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms that are associated with glaucoma are close to the gene for a long, non-coding RNA (CDKN2B-AS). We have recently demonstrated that mice with a deletion in the murine equivalent of CDKN2-AS are more susceptible to ganglion cell loss after an increase in intraocular pressure and have started to characterize microglial cells in the mutant mice by RNA sequencing.

My lab is currently funded by an R01 from the NEI, and since the inception of the laboratory in 2009, we have published 12 papers and one book chapter on glaucoma and related topics, with one more paper in press. I am an editor at Molecular Vision, and have reviewed manuscripts for over 20 different journals. I am also a member of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee at Schepens.

Endorsed by: Janey Wiggs, MD, PhD

I would like to respectfully submit my application to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee in the Glaucoma Section. I am currently an Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary/Schepens Eye Research Institute, and I have been a member of ARVO since 2006. My main research focus is on ganglion cell pathology in glaucoma, the contribution of glial cells in glaucoma, and the neuroanatomy of the retina. I have been a member of the retinal cell biology (RC) section of ARVO for several years before changing to GL, and I believe my background in cell biology would be useful on the AMPC. I would be delighted to serve on the GL program committee. 

 M. Francesca Cordeiro, MD, PhD, is a clinician scientist. She currently is chair of ophthalmology at Imperial College London and heads the Glaucoma and Retinal Neurodegeneration Research Group at UCL Institute of Ophthalmology. She is an Honorary Glaucoma Consultant Ophthalmologist/Research Lead at the Western Eye Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust in London, where she is director of the Clinical Trials Research Unit, and chairman of ICORG (Imperial College Ophthalmic Research Group).

She qualified in medicine from St. Bartholomew’s Hospital University of London and completed training in general and surgical ophthalmology at Moorfield’s Eye & St Thomas’ Hospitals in London in 2003, following her PhD at UCL in 1998. Her research mainly funded through the Wellcome Trust, is focused on the molecular mechanisms involved in either the treatment or pathogenesis of retinal neurodegenerative diseases, including glaucoma, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and diabetes. She has investigated novel and translational approaches to these problems, and has received a number of international awards for this work, including the Lewis Rudin Glaucoma Prize 2005 and Research to Prevent Blindness International Research Scholar Award USA 2015.

She serves on a number of international committees, including serving on the European Association for Vision and Eye Research (EVER) board, the European Vision Clinical Research network (EVICRnet) steering committee, and chairing the European Glaucoma Society Neuroprotection SIG. She is on the editorial board of various journals including Investigative Ophthalmology, Experimental Eye Research, Ophthalmic Research and Scientifica. She has been graduate tutor at UCL and mentors under- and graduates, including ophthalmologists, and is a Trustee for Fight for Sight Charity. 

Nominated by: John Danias, MD, PhD

It is my pleasure to nominate M Francesca Cordeiro, to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Glaucoma section of ARVO. Professor Cordeiro is currently Chair of Ophthalmology at Imperial College London and heads the "Glaucoma and Retinal Neurodegeneration Research Group" at UCL Institute of Ophthalmology. She is also the Director of the Clinical Trials Research Unit, and Chairman of Imperial College Ophthalmic Research Group and a long-time member of the ARVO Glaucoma section.

Professor Cordeiro, is a clinician-scientist who has previously performed ground-breaking research in glaucoma. She continues to work on furthering our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying glaucoma and other neurodegenerative disease. Her work is translational and of the highest quality. It has already resulted in ongoing clinical trials that will potentially change the way we practice clinical ophthalmology. 

Professor Cordeiro has a broad understanding of all aspects of glaucoma and has substantial experience as a reviewer of grant applications and manuscripts. Professor Cordeiro’s work has been funded by the Wellcome Trust. She has received the Lewis Rudin Glaucoma Prize in 2005 and Research to Prevent Blindness International Research Scholar Award in 2015. She serves on a number of international organizations including on the board of European Association for Vision and Eye Research (EVER) and the steering committee of the European Vision Clinical Research network (EVICRnet).

Professor Cordeiro is well-respected and well-liked by colleagues around the world. She will be a first-rate addition to the Annual Meeting Program Committee. As a member of the AMPC, Professor Cordeiro will provide input from a clinician-scientist perspective and an international colleague perspective. Her experience in basic, translational and clinical research as well as administration will prove invaluable for ARVO. It is for these reasons that I nominate Professor Cordeiro for a position in AMPC.

 Rafael Grytz, PhD received his master of science and PhD in civil engineering, both with distinction, from the Ruhr University Bochum in Germany. In 2009, Grytz was awarded the Deustche Studienpreis, 2nd prize, by the President of the German Parliament in recognition of his substantial and innovative glaucoma research work with outstanding relevance to society. After obtaining his PhD, Grytz completed a one-year postdoctoral fellowship, followed by an appointment as research associate at the Devers Eye Institute in Portland, Oregon. Since 2012, Grytz is an assistant professor of ophthalmology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Grytz has presented and published his research work across different research disciplines related to ophthalmology, bioengineering, and computational mechanics. Grytz is funded by the National Eye Institute and the BrightFocus foundation. Grytz has an excellent reputation as interdisciplinary researcher in glaucoma not only in the United Sates but also throughout Europe and Asia. He has a solid publication track record with 13 first or last author peer reviewed publications. He has presented 13 invited lectures at world leading institutes including Stanford University, Osaka University and Cardiff University.

Grytz has demonstrated throughout his career that he is committed and effective in providing valuable services to our international research community. He has organized 10 Minisymposia/Sessions at national and international conferences promoting the research exchange between vision sciences and computational biomechanics, in particular, related to glaucoma. Based on his broad interdisciplinary knowledge, Grytz’s services as reviewer are frequently requested across various disciplines. He serves as an active reviewer for 23 international journals. He currently serves on the editorial board of the Journal for Modeling in Ophthalmology. He also served as a grant reviewer for the International Glaucoma Association Research Awards and Fight for Sight PhD Studentship.

Nominated by: Ian Sigal, PhD

It is my pleasure to nominate Rafael Grytz,PhD, to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Glaucoma section.I have followed the scientific career of Dr. Grytz for the past 15 years and worked with him between 2009 and 2010 at the Devers Eye Institute, Portland,OR. Dr. Grytz is currently Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He is a pioneer in merging advanced bioengineering concepts and simulation tools with glaucoma research,which have brought about important advances. Dr. Grytz has interdisciplinary knowledge of various research directions that are growing but currently underrepresented in the GL section committee such as biomechanics of the optic nerve head, growth and remodeling mechanisms, mechanotransduction pathways. He is also knowledgeable of other pathologies that influence the susceptibility to glaucoma such as myopia. Dr Grytz started his career in Germany, and is convinced of the critical need of a diverse international community. He is funded by NEI and BrightFocus, and has received several awards in recognition of his research including The Thomas R. Lee Award for Glaucoma Research. He has organized 10 Minisymposia/Sessions at national and international conferences promoting the research exchange between Vision Sciences and the Biomechanics research community. In summary, Dr. Grytz will be a valuable member of the Glaucoma section Annual meeting program committee as he brings interdisciplinary knowledge, has international research experience, and is committed and capable to effectively serve our research community.

 IM Section

 Jennifer Thorne, MD, PhD, has been a member of the IM Section of ARVO for approximately 20 years. She is a board-certified ophthalmologist, fellowship-trained in ocular immunology, and a PhD-trained epidemiologist, who is based at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute.

Her interests include the design and conduct of multicenter clinical trials and epidemiologic studies evaluating ocular inflammatory diseases and their clinical and treatment outcomes. In this capacity, she has served as the deputy director of the Studies of Ocular Complications of AIDS (SOCA) and is a member of the Steering Committee of the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration in Research and Design. She is the medical officer for the Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) Trial, chairs the medical therapy quality assurance committee for the MUST and is protocol chair for the Periocular vs Intravitreal Steroid Treatment (POINT) Trial, a MUST-sponsored trial for the treatment of uveitic macular edema. She has served on the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN) Working Group’s Executive and Steering Committees since their inception and has assisted in the development of the classification terms as well as the case collection and selection processes to date.

She has extensive experience in the statistical analysis of clinical outcomes in ocular inflammatory diseases as well as the ocular complications of AIDS. As the uveitis fellowship director at the Wilmer Eye Institute, she has mentored and supervised fellows since 2007 and has served on the board of managers of the AUPO Fellowship Compliance Committee (currently as Chair of the Review Committee). She is a member of the International Ocular Inflammation Society, the International Uveitis Study Group, and the Pan-American Association of Ophthalmology, as well as the American Uveitis Society, for which she currently serves as president-elect. She is chair for the US national faculty for the international education program called the 3E (Evidence, Expertise, and Exchange) Uveitis Program sponsored by AbbVie, Inc. She teaches as part of a group of international experts in uveitis in south-east Asia in conjunction with the Indo-China Ophthalmologic Study Group.

She has mentored numerous medical students, research and clinical fellows, and junior faculty in clinical research. Current collaborations include studies in birdshot retinochoroidopathy both nationally and internationally, and large database collaborations on women in ophthalmology, and on epidemiology and cost burden of uveitis.

Nominated by: Justine Smith, MBBS, PhD, FARVO

I most enthusiastically nominate Dr. Jennifer E. – ‘Jen’ – Thorne to serve as the next member of the IM Section Program Committee. Jen is Professor of Ophthalmology and Epidemiology, and Director of the Division of Ocular Immunology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. She is an ophthalmologist clinician-scientist, who would bring valuable clinical research perspective to our Section's Program Committee. Jen is an international leader in clinical outcomes research on ocular inflammation, including both ocular infections and non-infectious inflammatory eye diseases. For multiple years, she has been one of the leaders at the head of some of the most significant initiatives for the clinical sphere of our field, including the Standardization of Uveitis – otherwise known as SUN – project, the ‘MUST’ clinical trials network, and the ‘SOCA’ ocular complications of AIDS project. Jen collaborates widely across international borders, and has conducted research in Europe, as well as the US. She also interacts with industry on a regular basis, including advising on trial design and execution. Thus Jen's perspective on clinical research is internationally informed and reflects a balance of academia and industry. Jen is a long-time member of ARVO. She began attending as a ‘member in training’ approximately 20 years ago and has never missed an Annual Meeting. Notably, in her position as a senior clinician-scientist, she has been instrumental in encouraging junior clinical trainees in the area of ocular inflammation to attend and participate in the meeting. The importance of cultivating appreciation for research amongst this group of potential future clinical leaders at ARVO cannot be overstated. Jen is a very fair reviewer, and when she programs, her exceptional level of knowledge ensures she recognizes cutting-edge and creative work for high quality podium sessions. In short, Dr. Jennifer E. Thorne is ideally qualified to join the IM Section Program Committee.

 Richard Lee, MRCS, MRCOphth, PhD, is dual-trained as a clinician and laboratory scientist and holds a PhD in translational ocular immunology. He has been a practicing physician for 20 years, the last 10 of which have been dedicated to the care of patients with inflammatory eye diseases. In his role as lead for Experimental Medicine in the Inflammation and Immunotherapy theme of the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Moorefield’s Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) he is responsible for preclinical human in vitro studies and early phase clinical trials in the main UK government funded program for research in inflammatory ophthalmic diseases. He is also deputy director of the NIHR Moorfields Clinical Research Facility, which is the world’s largest eye research clinic, giving him broad experience of best practice and innovation in the conduct of research in humans. His outlook is strongly collegiate and he was instrumental in the establishment of the Universities and National Institutes Transatlantic Eye (UNITE) consortium for human ocular immunology which formally links the NIHR Moorfields BRC, University of Bristol and the U.S. National Eye Institute. This outward facing, inclusive approach to delivering excellence in translational research makes him ideally suited to membership of ARVO Immunology/Microbiology Annual Meeting Program Committee. He has been awarded as the principal investigator or co-applicant more than £9m in research grants and has contributed to a further £10m in institutional research funding awards. 

Nominated by: Rachel Caspi, PhD, FARVO

The case has strongly been made by our current IM AMPC Chair for nominating a clinician/scientist, as this expertise is now needed on the Committee to support the annual ARVO Abstract review process. In this context, our colleague Richard Lee of the NIHR Moorfields BRC and University of Bristol, UK, would be exactly “what the Doctor ordered”. Richard is an advanced-early to mid-career clinician-scientist, who is a rising star and already an authority in the field of ocular immunology. He furthermore would maintain an international presence on the IM AMPC Committee. Richard’s areas of scientific expertise include adaptive immune responses in the context of systemic immunotherapy, development of novel targeted immunotherapies, immune imaging and deep immunophenotyping in man. He is also an experienced clinician. This breadth of perspective with an emphasis on translational and human immunological studies adds significant value to his role on the ARVO Immunology/Microbiology annual meeting program committee. Richard’s work is published in leading peer-reviewed journals for general science (PNAS), general medicine (The Lancet), specialist science (Journal of Immunology and Journal of Autoimmunity) and ophthalmology (Ophthalmology, American Journal of Ophthalmology) and he has given more than 40 invited scientific lectures across 4 continents. As such, he will not only serve the membership of the IM section well, but also possesses the stature to represent our Section to the broader ARVO community. He will be an excellent addition to the Committee.

Jaya Rajaiya, PhD received her PhD for studies on mycobacterial disease pathogenesis, with a focus on development of a recombinant vaccine for tuberculosis and other mycobacterial diseases. During her dissertation, she received a W.H.O. student exchange award and worked at the Medical Research Council, Hammersmith London. During this time, she won an “award to inventors” and procured a patent that was licensed to Inflazyme. Her postdoctoral training in basic molecular biology focused on the role of transcription factors in gene expression. More recently, as an independently NIH-funded scientist, she has applied this expertise in molecular biology and background in infectious disease pathogenesis to studies of adenoviral pathogenesis, and expanded her work into viral trafficking and cell signaling in ocular adenoviral infection. Rajaiya is a key member of a large genomic study of adenovirus “-omics”. This project seeks to elucidate the transcriptome and proteome of human adenoviruses most closely associated with corneal infection. She has authored multiple per-reviewed articles, including recently published work showing that recombination among adenoviruses can create new viruses with a tropism for the eye. Rajaiya teaches at Harvard Medical School and recently received the “Excellence in Teaching Award.” Rajaiya also directs the post-doctoral training program at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. She leads the weekly seminar series for postdoctoral fellows, and oversees their participation in Responsible Conduct in Research. This seminar series is designed to provide an opportunity to share their work with their peers and faculty, to gain experience in scientific presentation, and to receive feedback from scientists outside their own laboratory. In this role she has done much to mentor the next generation of vision scientists, and this will be valuable experience for her role on the AMPC.

Nominated by: Michael Gilmore, PhD

I am delighted to nominate Jaya Rajaiya, PhD, to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Immunology and Microbiology section of ARVO. Dr. Rajaiya is currently an Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School. She has been a long-time member of the Immunology and Microbiology section. She began her research career studying mycobacterial pathogenesis, did a fellowship in B cell development, and is currently working on viral trafficking, infection, and inflammation of the cornea. Her work is routinely published in top tier vision research and virology journals reflecting the high quality of her work. Her career course makes her an excellent candidate for this committee. Her work has been important to cell biologists and immunologists, as it makes clear that it is the specific trafficking pathway and involvement of signaling molecules dictates specific chemokine activation in corneal infection. Additionally, Dr. Rajaiya is very involved in teaching, and has a broad knowledge of other ocular infections. She is an excellent colleague, very thoughtful and personable, and would be a great addition to the Committee.

LE Section

Michael Wormstone, PhD, received his BSc (Hons) in Pharmacology from the University of Portsmouth and his PhD in Cell Biology and Physiology from the University of East Anglia under the mentorship of George Duncan. He joined the faculty of East Anglia in 2007 as a lecturer and currently serves as a senior lecturer. In 2008 he was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine. In 2015 he received the NFER Cataract Research Award and in 2016 was named a Fellow of ARVO. Wormstone has been an active participant in ARVO since 1996 and has served as session moderator on numerous occasions. In addition, he has been involved in organizing of ISER symposia as well as other scientific meetings. He currently serves on the editorial board of IOVS. He has been actively involved in training graduate students having trained 15 students since 2001. Wormstone’s publication record and his dedication to lens research as well as his training in pharmacology, cell biology, and physiology make him a highly recognized, well-rounded scientist; the type of colleague that would serve the lens community well as a member of the AMPC.

Nominated by: Kevin Schey, PhD, FARVO

It is my distinct honor to nominate Dr. Michael Wormstone to serve on the lens Annual Meeting Program Committee. Dr. Wormstone is a Senior Lecturer at the University of East Anglia and has an international reputation in lens and vision research. His research program focuses on molecular mechanisms of posterior capsular opacification (PCO) and cataractogenesis with the goal of developing new therapeutic approaches for its prevention. Specifically, his work has contributed to our understanding of the signaling pathways involved in PCO, identified novel targets for therapeutic intervention, and examined pharmacologic interventions and the potential role of IOLs could play in PCO prevention. His papers have contributed to our understanding of oxidative stress, DNA damage, TGF-beta signaling, ER stress and wound healing in the lens. In summary, the breadth of his fundamental knowledge of the biology, biochemistry and pharmacology of PCO, as well as the translational aspects of his work, complement the expertise of existing AMPC members. He is very well-liked and respected in the lens community and would serve our section with great energy and enthusiasm.

Salil Lachke, PhD, received his PhD with Professor David Soll at the University of Iowa studying molecular genetics of cell differentiation. Lachke then trained with Professor Richard Maas at Harvard where his post-doctoral research aimed at (1) understanding gene regulation in lens development, (2) investigating the cell biology of fiber differentiation, (3) use of mouse genetics and gene-knockdown in chicken to model cataract, and (4) development of new bioinformatics-based approaches to identify novel genes in clinical cases of cataract. After being a Harvard instructor in medicine, Lachke became a faculty at the University of Delaware, where he is awaiting promotion to Associate Professor with Tenure starting fall 2017. Lachke has identified a novel gene TDRD7 linked to lens development and cataracts in human, mouse and chicken. This significant discovery was published as an article in Science and opened up a new area of investigation in the lens gene regulation field that addresses the significance of RNA-binding protein mediated post-transcriptional control during fiber differentiation.

Since this initial discovery, Lachke’s research has identified and characterized numerous new genes involved in lens biology and cataracts, including the RNA-binding proteins Caprin2 (conserved in chicken, mouse), Celf1 (conserved in fish, frog, mouse) and Rbm24 (conserved in fish, frog, mouse), transcription regulators (Mafg, Mafk), cell adhesion molecules (PVRL3), and selenoproteins (Sep15), among many others. Lachke’s group established a new model for aged cataract and showed that small Maf proteins control the sterol pathway in aged lenses, perturbation of which is linked to human cataracts. These discoveries were possible because of a systems-based tool called iSyTE (integrated Systems Tool for Eye gene discovery) that he developed, which is now widely used by the lens research community to identify and analyze new genes and pathways linked to lens development and cataracts. Lachke is a reviewer for 27 journals, and regularly reviews for IOVS, EER, and Molecular Vision.

He has moderated poster/paper sessions at ARVO in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, and organized a Minisymposium at ARVO 2015 (participating sections LE, BI, CO, RC, RE). He is participating in an ARVO 2017 Minisymposium and pre-conference education course on Big Data. Lachke is funded by NEI through 2021 and has many recognitions: 2005 D.C. Spriestersbach Prize, University of Iowa (Excellence in Doctoral Research), 2008 Charles Epstein Trainee Research Award, American Society of Human Genetics (Excellence in Post-doctoral Clinical Research), 2009 BWH-Biomedical Research Institute’s Research Excellence Award, 2010 Bettelheim Young Investigator Award, International Society of Eye Research (Excellence in Cataract Research), 2012 Fight For Sight Young Investigator, 2013 Knights Templar Young investigator, 2013 Alcon Young Investigator, 2013 Kavli Fellow, National Academy of Sciences of the U.S., 2014 Senior Thesis Mentor Award, University of Delaware, 2015 Frederick Bettelheim Award, National Foundation for Eye Research, and 2016 Gerard J. Mangone Young Scholar, Francis Alison Society.

Most significantly, Lachke was named a Pew Scholar in Biomedical Sciences by The Pew Charitable Trusts — a distinct honor awarded to “22 of America’s Most Promising Scientists” in 2012.

Nominated by: Michael Robinson, PhD, FARVO

It is my distinct pleasure to nominate Dr. Salil A. Lachke for a position on the Annual Meeting Program Committee.  Salil began his long-term interest in lens biology during his postdoctoral fellowship with Dr. Richard Maas at Harvard University Medical School in 2003. While in the Maas lab, Salil acquired a fascination with cataracts and lens development.  His seminal 2011 Science article describing mutations in the RNA granule protein TDRD7 as a cause of human pediatric cataracts opened up a new area of lens research that has promoted a completely new understanding of the importance of post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in the lens. His passion for lens research merged beautifully with his expertise in systems biology resulting in the creation of iSyTE. This truly transformative tool, that Salil created and still administers, uniquely brings together comprehensive gene expression data in a searchable format, fueling important discoveries for many different lens and ocular biology research labs.  A great many of us in the lens community have benefited from Salil’s insight and generous willingness to collaborate.  The very nature of his work requires impeccable scholarship and familiarity with all aspects of lens biology.  Salil remains the “go to” person for understanding and interpreting the complex gene regulatory networks that the lens requires to maintain its unique structure and transparency. As a rising star in lens research, Salil first appeared at ARVO in 2009, and has actively participated in ARVO ever since.  The lens section is fortunate to count Salil among our membership. His recent successful navigation through the tenure and promotion process at The University of Delaware puts Salil in a perfect position to dedicate the time and effort required to advocate for the lens section and to help craft the best possible ARVO meeting program for the coming three years.

Sheikh Amer Riazuddin, PhD, received his PhD from Johns Hopkins School University in 2002. He completed his dissertation research in Dr. McMacken’s laboratory investigating the DNA-binding domain of bacteriophage lambda O protein. After graduating, Riazuddin joined the Hejtmancik research group at National Eye Institute (NEI) as a postdoctoral fellow. During his tenure at the NEI, Riazuddin focused on investigating the genetic basis of different ophthalmic disorders including congenital cataracts. His research work in Hejtmancik’s laboratory resulted in eight publications including four first author publications. In 2007, Riazuddin joined at McKusick Nathen’s Institute of Genetic Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Katsanis lab. Although, Riazuddin’s stay in Katsanis laboratory was brief, he co-authored six peer reviewed manuscripts including five first author publications.

Riazuddin joined the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute as faculty in 2009 and established his independent research program. His research interests include both identifying the genetic determinants of cataractogenesis and understanding their functional significance. Riazuddin’s lab uses a systematic approach that consists of genome-wide linkage analyses followed by sequencing of candidate genes and subsequent in vivo and in vitro functional studies of causal alleles. More recently Riazuddin’s lab modified their approach has included next generation DNA sequencing of captured linkage intervals, whole exomes, and genomes. While Riazuddin has continued his work in the field of ocular genetics, he has expanded the scope of his research to investigate the role of autophagy in the development of the ocular lens and maintenance of its transparency.

The Riazuddin lab recently identified 100+ autophagy-associated genes in the transcriptome of the developing mouse lens including FYCO1. Interestingly, FYCO1, a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) binding protein family, is the largest genetic contributor of congenital cataracts in the familial cohort that Riazuddin has ascertained. Through an elegant use of knockout mouse model and human lens epithelial (HLE) knock-in (KI) cell line harboring a nonsense mutation associated with cataractogenesis, data from Riazuddin’s lab confirm the association of FYCO1 with autophagy in lens epithelial cells and its indispensable role in ocular lens development. In parallel, Riazuddin’s lab recently identified DNAJB1, an autophagy associated heat shock protein as the downstream target of FOXE3, a transcription factor reported to harbor mutations associated with anterior segment dysgenesis. Integration of these data sets will improve our understanding of autophagy in anterior segment dysgenesis, and provide cellular and molecular entry point to improve management of the clinical phenotype.

Nominated by: Marc Kantorow, PhD, FARVO

It is with great pleasure that I nominate S. Amer Riazuddin for the Annual Meeting Program Committee (AMPC) for the LE section.

Amer received his Ph.D. from the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. After graduating from Johns Hopkins, Amer completed postdoctoral fellowships at the National Eye Institute (NIH) and Johns Hopkins McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine .

Amer joined the Wilmer Eye Institute as tenure-track faculty and established his independent research program to investigate the genetic determinants of congenital cataracts and other anterior segment dystrophies. In parallel to investigating the genetic determinants of cataractogenesis, Amer has focused on the investigating the potential role of autophagy in normal development and physiological functioning of the lens.

Amer is an incredibly productive researcher who has co-authored 75+ publications and has contributed to the ocular lens community through the identification of multiple new genetic loci and novel causal mutations responsible for congenital cataracts. His laboratory recently published next-generation based RNA sequencing of mouse lens transcriptome including both the mRNA and the micro RNA profile at six developmental stages, a significant resource a reference to the scientific community investigating the genetic basis of congenital cataracts.

Importantly, Amer is a great proponent of lens research and a great advocate for the lens and vision research community.  He provide strong and inclusive leadership and will be a great asset to the lens section members of ARVO and the greater mission of the ARVO meetings. 

In light of the above accomplishments, I enthusiastically nominate Dr. Riazuddin for the Annual Meeting Program Committee (AMPC) of the LE section.

LV Section 

Nicole Ross, OD, MSc, is currently an assistant professor at the New England College of Optometry (NECO) and an attending optometrist at the NECO Center for Eye Care, Perkins School for the Blind and the NECO Mobile Clinic. Ross is a clinician within the specialty of low vision rehabilitation, trained in both residency and fellowship in this area. Additionally, Ross has a previous background in vision research, specifically in the area of low vision enhancement.

Ross has been dedicated to this area of study since optometry school where she enrolled in a dual degree (OD/ MSc) program. Her master’s dissertation reviewed the perceptual and optical consequences of utilizing prisms to expand the peripheral field for patients with hemianopia, and addressed patient adaptation to this strategy. Her research advisors for this project were Dr. Eli Peli and Dr. Alex Bowers, at Schepens Eye Research Institute. During her student career, Ross was the recipient of the Envision-Atwell Award, Feinbloom Low Vision Student Award, and the Minnie Flaura Turner Memorial awards for impaired vision research.

Following completion of a residency in vision rehabilitation at The Ohio State University, Ross was accepted to the competitive clinical fellowship at Wilmer Eye Institute. As part of her fellowship at the Wilmer Eye Institute, Ross successfully took on a number of research projects in addition to a busy clinical schedule. During her fellowship, Ross has investigated areas of the central vision field related to self-reported task difficulty, referral patterns for low vision services, the effect of eccentric viewing training on the properties of the preferred retinal locus, and participated in early works to explore the role of real-time image processing in the management of central vision loss. Her work on central vision loss correlated specific areas within the central 20 degrees of visual field with patient self-reported task difficulty using the activity inventory visual function questionnaire, indicating which areas of the central visual field are related to task performance. For her work in this area, Ross was asked to present both platform and symposia talks at the ARVO Annual Meeting, and platform talks at Vision 2014 and 2017, the major international conference in low vision rehabilitation.

Nominated by: Russell Woods, PhD

It is my pleasure to nominate Dr. Nicole Ross to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Low Vision (LV) cross-sectional group of ARVO. Dr. Ross has been actively involved in low vision research with presentations at the annual meeting and publications in ARVO’s  journals since 2009.  Dr. Ross currently has ongoing research projects including feasibility of tele-rehabilitation, outcome measures of low vision rehabilitation and exploration of image enhancement for low vision, which have received foundation grant funding.  Dr. Ross has published 21 peer-reviewed abstracts, several papers and three book chapters  and given many invited symposium talks in the field of low vision rehabilitation. Dr. Ross was awarded the Envision-Atwell award for best presentation at ARVO by a junior scientist in the field of low vision, and the rising star award by the American Schools and Colleges of Optometry.

Dr. Ross has acted as a peer-reviewer for Clinical and Experimental Optometry and Optometry and Vision Science. Other areas of her national service to the field of low vision rehabilitation include: her recent role as program chair for the low vision section of the American Academy of Optometry, participation in ARVO/NAEVR’s joint advocacy days at capitol hill, and participation in the Low Vision Research Group (LVRG). 

MOI Section 

Richard Rosen, FACS, FASRS, CRA, MD, is a vitreoretinal surgeon and medical retina consultant at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, where he serves as vice chairman and director of ophthalmology research, as well as surgeon director, retina service chief, and retina fellowship director. Rosen is professor of ophthalmology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and visiting professor in applied optics at the University of Kent in Canterbury, U.K., where he was awarded an honorary doctorate in medical physics His received his bachelor’s degree in psychology and anthropology at the University of Michigan and his MD from the University of Miami School of Medicine. He also did graduate work in psychophysics in the Laboratory of Neuromagnetism at New York University, and worked for several years as a professional photographer in New York City, with an interest in ophthalmic/scientific photography.

Rosen’s research interests include new treatments for macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy, innovations in diagnostic retinal imaging, and vitreoretinal surgical instrumentation. Through collaboration with the University of Kent and Ophthalmic Technologies (OTI), he helped develop the first multimodal OCT/SLO instruments which featured ultraigh resolution, integrated ICG angiography, and integrated microperimetry. His Advanced Retinal Imaging Laboratory has contributed to translational research into high frequency and 3-D ultrasound, macular pigment densitometry, retinal and choroidal blood flow monitoring, retinal oximetry and metabolic imagingand clinical microscopy. In collaboration with Dan-Ning Hu, director of the NYEE Ocular Cell Culture Laboratory, he has also been actively involved in RPE studies of melatonin and zeaxanthin and their role in AMD.

Most recently, Rosen led a team to construct the Marrus Adaptive Optics Imaging Facility within the Einhorn Clinical Research Center of the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, which provides easy access to single cell retinal imaging diagnostics for patients in the metropolitan region. Innovative tools for measuring retinal capillary dynamics, developed in the Center, have been adopted by clinical instrument companies for quantitative analysis of OCT angiography, the latest diagnostic advance for the management of diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma and neuro-ophthalmic disorders. Rosen has authored numerous book chapters and more than 100 articles in peer-reviewed journals. He has served on the Executive Board of the American Society of Ocular Trauma, the editorial boards of Retinal Physician and Ophthalmic Lasers, Surgery and Imaging, and multiple committees of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Nominated by: Hiroshi Ishikawa, MD, FARVO

It is my great pleasure to nominate Richard B Rosen, MD, to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee (AMPC) for the Multidisciplinary Ophthalmic Imaging (MOI) section of ARVO. Dr. Rosen is currently Professor and Vice Chairman at New York Eye & Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai School of Medicine and Director of Ophthalmology Research. Dr. Rosen is a recognized expert in the field of retinal imaging with contributions in the clinical development of en face OCT, OCT angiography, and adaptive optics imaging.

Dr. Rosen has been a frequent contributor to ARVO over the past 23 years with posters and podium presentations, and has served a moderator for these events as well. He has more than than 100 peer review papers in the literature, substantial experience as a reviewer of grant applications and manuscripts, and is a regularly invited to contribute to international symposia around the world

In addition, Dr. Rosen is Chief of Retina at the Infirmary, Retina Fellowship Director, and an actively practicing clinician and surgeon. His clinical, surgical, and laboratory experience have provided him with a broad understanding of various retinal pathologies and his collaborative experiences with the imaging industry have given him insight into current and future trends in diagnostic and therapeutic innovations. I give Richard Rosen my very strongest support and nominate him in the most enthusiastically to serve on the AMPC for the MOI section at ARVO.

Hao Zhang, PhD, received his bachelor and master degrees from Shanghai Jiao Tong University (Shanghai, China) in 1997 and 2000, respectively, and his PhD degree from Texas A&M University (College Station, Texas) in 2006. From 2006 to 2007, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Washington University in St. Louis. He has been focusing on developing novel optical imaging technologies for over 15 years. He and colleagues reported their work in Nature Biotechnology (2006), Nature Protocols (2007), PNAS (2010, 2016), Light: Science & Applications (by Nature 2015) and Nature Communications (2016). In 2010, he received the NSF CAREER award to develop an unique combined optical imaging and vision science research and education program at Northwestern University. Since 2010, Zhang and colleagues have been awarded several large NEI-funded projects including R01s, RC4 and R24 awards.

Zhang is also a theme leader in a recent NEI T32 training grant awarded to Northwestern University. In addition, Zhang has served as the mentor for one NEI F31 award, one JDRF postdoctoral training award, one HHMI International Research Fellow award and multiple local seed grants to train next-generation investigators on retinal imaging. Zhang is a frequent reviewer for NIH, NSF and multiple national/international research foundations. Zhang has reviewed manuscripts for over 20 journals and multiple scientific conferences. He is an associate editor for Biomedical Optics Express, Current Eye Research, and Scientific Reports. His research interests include optical coherence tomography, super-resolution imaging, single molecule imaging and vision science.

Nominated by: Joel Schuman, MD

It is my great pleasure to nominate Hao F. Zhang, PhD, to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Multidisciplinary Ophthalmic Imaging (MOI) Cross-Sectional Group of ARVO. Dr. Zhang is an Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Ophthalmology at Northwestern University and has been a long-time member of ARVO and the MOI group. He is an expert in developing novel retinal imaging technologies and is best known for his ground-breaking work on developing the latest extension of functional imaging using OCT, referred to as visible-light OCT. Using visible-light OCT, researchers can now quantify oxygen metabolism in the retina for the first time. Scientifically, Dr. Zhang is very collaborative and has broad research connections around the world. Besides laboratory investigations, Dr. Zhang is actively pursuing translating novel imaging technologies into clinical cares. Dr. Zhang also has ample experience in organizing scientific conferences, reviewing manuscripts from multiple disciplines, and reviewing research grants for NIH, NSF, and private foundations. Dr. Zhang is a current associate editor of Biomedical Optics Express. All these track records demonstrate that Dr. Zhang will be an excellent fit with the committee and will make significant contribution to both the MOI group and ARVO.

Stacey Choi, PhD, is an associate professor in the College of Optometry and the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science at the Ohio State University. Choi received her PhD degree from the Department of Optometry and Vision Science at the University of Auckland in New Zealand in 2000. This was followed by postdoctoral work at the University of California at Berkeley with Jay M. Enoch on the Stiles-Crawford Effect (SCE) in myopia and then at the University of Rochester with David R. Williams on adaptive optics (AO). Subsequently, Choi has worked with John S. Werner at the University of California, Davis on the clinical application of AO retinal imaging. Choi has been a member of ARVO since 2000.

Choi’s primary research interest ranges from the clinical application of AO to high resolution retinal imaging and psychophysics. Over the last 14 years, Choi’s research has focused on studying various retinal and optic nerve diseases as well as understanding retinal physiology and function in both normal and diseased retinae using AO retinal imaging systems and clinical functional tests.

One of the current research areas in the Choi laboratory is measuring the SCE of individual cone photoreceptors using AO imaging systems on both normal and diseased retinae. Her research is currently funded by the Department of Defense to examine retinal changes in blast induced mild traumatic brain injury.

Choi has participated on several conference program committees, grant reviews as well as numerous journal manuscript reviews.

Nominated by: Michael Pircher, PhD

I am pleased to nominate Dr. Stacey Choi for consideration to the Annual Meeting Program Committee (AMPC) seat on the Multidisciplinary Ophthalmic Imaging (MOI) Cross-sectional Group for 2017.

Dr. Choi has been an active member of ARVO since 2000 and is currently an associate professor in the College of Optometry and the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science at the Ohio State University, USA. Dr. Choi has done extensive work on various retinal and optic nerve diseases using adaptive optics (AO) imaging modalities. Having both research and clinical expertise, Dr. Choi is uniquely positioned to bring together AO technology and eye disorders.

Dr. Choi’s background makes her an ideal fit to the MOI program committee as she has a broad background pertinent to MOI, and will work hard for the interests of the group. She has my full confidence and I’m sure that she will serve, in the case of being elected, the community conscientiously.

PH Section 

Haiyan Gong, MD, PhD, is a professor of ophthalmology, anatomy and neurobiology at Boston University School of Medicine (Boston, Mass.). She graduated from Jiangxi Medical College (Nanchang, China) and received her ophthalmology and retina training at Peking Union Medical College (Beijing, China). Afterfour years as a practicing ophthalmologist in Peking Union Hospital, she did a one-year post-doctoral research fellowship at West Virginia University (Morgantown, W.V.). She then completed her PhD training in anatomy and neurobiology at Boston University School of Medicine.

Gong has been working on the physiology and morphology of the aqueous outflow pathway for 30 years and published over 60 original articles, invited scientific reviews and textbook chapters. Gong’s research is focused on understanding the mechanisms that regulate aqueous humor outflow resistance in normal eyes and how this resistance is increased in the eyes with primary open angle glaucoma in order to provide new insights for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat this disease. Gong’s lab has developed a novel fluorophore-guided method to study the relationship between outflow facility, active outflow areas and morphology.

This unique method uses the effective filtration area as a new parameter in examining the structural changes responsible for the changes in outflow facility or intraocular pressure in ocular hypotensive or hypertensive animal models and human glaucomatous eyes. She has been using this new method to investigate the mechanisms of increased outflow facility by Rho-kinase inhibitors as well as novel micro-invasive surgical devices. Gong is currently funded by NIH/National Eye Institute, BrightFocus Foundation and Massachusetts Lions Eye Research Fund.

In addition to her research, Gong has trained numerous graduate students and has served as an ad hoc reviewer for grant applications for NIH study section and other national and international research foundations.

Nominated by: Carol Toris, PhD

It is with pleasure that I nominate Haiyan Gong, MD, PhD, to serve on the program committee for the Physiology and Pharmacology section. Haiyan is currently a Professor of Ophthalmology, Anatomy and Neurobiology at Boston University School of Medicine. She is an ARVO Silver Fellow, and has been an active and contributing member of ARVO for 30 years. Her research is focused on understanding the mechanisms that regulate aqueous humor outflow resistance in normal eyes and how this resistance is increased in the eyes with primary open angle glaucoma in order to provide new insights for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat this disease. Using newly developed methods, she investigated and reported the mechanisms of increased outflow facility by Rho-kinase inhibitors.

At ARVO, Dr. Gong has been an active and contributing member for 30 years. She presented papers, posters and workshops including being selected hot topic presentations and served as a session moderator. She had served as a mentor for the ARVO Developing Country Eye Researcher Travel Fellowship for 5 years. Dr. Gong is currently a Silver Fellow of ARVO. 

Dr. Gong is more than able to take on the responsibilities needed for the annual planning committee. She will serve the PH section well. 

Chi-Wai Do, PhD, received his bachelor degree in optometry from The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. He then pursued a PhD study investigating the ion transport machinery in ciliary epithelium at the same university. In 2002, he moved to the U.S. upon graduation and completed his postdoctoral training at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine under the supervision of Mortimer M. Civan. In 2006, he joined the School of Optometry at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University as an assistant professor and was promoted to associate professor in 2013. Currently, he serves as the chairman of departmental research committee and associate head of the school. He also serves on the organizing committee of local and regional conferences, as well as numerous statutory boards of the Hong Kong Government.

Do’s research interests lie in the area of glaucoma pathophysiology. His research has been focused on understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying the control of aqueous humor secretion, outflow facility and intraocular pressure (IOP). He has adopted an integrated approach using both in vitro and in vivo models to investigate the regulatory pathways and signaling cascades responsible for the modulation of aqueous humor dynamics and thereby IOP. Recently, he has been exploring the biomedical significance of herbal supplements for the prevention and treatment of ocular diseases. His work has been published in high impact journals under the disciplines of cell physiology, optometry and ophthalmology. In addition, he has served as a reviewer for many of these journals.

Nominated by: Mortimer Civan, MD, FARVO

Dr. Chi-wai Do joined my lab in Feb 18, 2002 and quickly demonstrated not only great skill at the bench, but also a wide interest ln research developments in the broad range of the physiology and pharmacology of the eye. Much to his credit, he did not accept my evaluations without presenting his own ideas. He will be an exemplary AMPC.

RC Section

Manuel Vidal-Sanz, MD, PhD, FARVO, received his MD from Valladolid University (Spain) in 1979 and his PhD from the Complutense University (Madrid) in 1984. He became a Medical Research Council of Canada Postdoctoral Fellow under the supervision of Albert J. Aguayo, in the Centre for Research in Neuroscience at McGill University (1984 -1991) (Montreal, Canada) where he obtained a PhD in neurosciences. In 1991, he was appointed research staff member of the Cajal Institute (Madrid) and in 1992 moved to Murcia University, where he started the Laboratory of Experimental Ophthalmology. He became full professor of experimental ophthalmology on July 1996 at Murcia University School of Medicine (Murcia, Spain). Vidal-Sanz’s research interests are in the area of neurodegeneration, neuroprotection and repair of the adult mammalian visual system. Vidal-Sanz’s laboratory studies degeneration and neuroprotection of the adult rodent visual system in a variety of injury-induced models that have been established in the laboratory and uses modern techniques to quantify the effects of these injuries on several retinal populations, including retinal ganglion cells and photoreceptors. Vidal-Sanz has co-authored a number of widely cited articles in his field.

He has been continuously funded by Spanish, European and international granting agencies since 1990. He has been an active member of ARVO for over 25 years and has attended every ARVO meetings for the last 25 years. Vidal-Sanz serves on several editorial boards and on grant review panels for Spanish and international granting agencies. Vidal-Sanz has served as treasurer and member of the Council of the Spanish Society for Neuroscience and in 1997 was a visiting professor at the Department of Developmental Neuroscience of Uppsala University (Sweden). Vidal-Sanz presently serves as member of the ARVO Global Members Committee and the Global Mentorship Program and is chair of the Physiology, Biochemistry and Pharmacology Committee of the European Association for Vision and Eye Research.

Vidal-Sanz served as head of the Department of Ophthalmology of Murcia University from May 1997 to April 2006, when he was appointed vice chancelor of health sciences and institutional relations of Murcia University. Vidal-Sanz is the director of the Interdepartmental Vision Sciences Graduate Program, which supports graduate students and postdoctoral fellows as they begin their careers as vision scientists. Vidal-Sanz teaches physiology of the visual system.

Over the last years, Vidal-Sanz’s Laboratory has been a pioneer in developing a number of experimental models in adult rodents to characterize the effects of different types of retinal injury on the survival of RGCs: e.g., axotomy (induced by complete intraorbital optic nerve transection, or crush, transient ischemia of the retina induced by elevation of the IOP or by selective ligature of the ophthalmic vessels, and ocular hypertension (OHT) induced by laser photocoagulation of the trabecular meshworkand the perilimbar and episcleral veins).

Vidal-Sanz has published 126 peer reviewed scientific articles and has an H-index of 45. His work has been cited over 6,000 times.

Nominated by: Maria Paz Villegas-Perez, MD, PhD

It is my pleasure to nominate Manuel Vidal-Sanz, M.D., Ph.D., FARVO, to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Retinal Cell biology section of ARVO. Dr. Vidal-Sanz is currently professor of Experimental Ophthalmology at the University of Murcia (Spain) where he teaches ocular physiology and neurophysiology of the visual system in undergraduate and Vision Sciences graduate programme. Dr. Vidal-Sanz is a long-time member of the Retinal Cell Biology section. Prof. Vidal-Sanz is a recognized expert in the fields of regeneration, degeneration and neuroprotection of the adult mammalian visual system, which make him an excellent match to the current needs of the committee. In addition, Dr. Vidal-Sanz has a broad understanding of the retina and has substantial experience as a reviewer of grant applications and manuscripts. He is well-respected and well-liked by his colleagues around the world. He will be a first-rate addition to the committee.

Goldis Malek, PhD, is an associate professor at Duke University with appointments in the Departments of Ophthalmology and Pathology. She received her BS and BA in biology and psychology from the University of South Florida and her PhD degree in vision science and physiological optics from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, during which time she developed an interest in studying the pathology and cellular mechanisms underlying retinal diseases. After completing her postdoctoral studies at Duke University in the Department of Ophthalmology, she joined the faculty in 2006.

Malek has a strong background in cell biology and pathology of the posterior eye. She has extensive experience in development of murine models of retinal degeneration and has been testing targeted therapies for retinal diseases. Currently, her laboratory focuses on identifying and defining the mechanism of action of nuclear receptors in the aging retina and age-related macular degeneration. To date, her lab has identified several lipid, steroid hormone and toxin-activated nuclear receptors, which may play a role in retinal disease initiation and progression using genetic and pharmacological methods both in in vitro models of retinal pigment epithelial and choroidal endothelial cells as well as in vivo. Of note, her labs’ research efforts have received several recognitions, including an Alcon Research Institute Young Investigator Award, a Research to Prevent Blindness Sybil B. Harrington Scholars Award, and a BrightFocus Foundation, Carolyn K. McGillvray Memorial Award for Macular Degeneration Research. Malek has reviewed grant applications for NEI and several research foundations and is an editorial board member for Molecular Vision, Current Eye Research, Journal of Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics and Nuclear Receptor Research. She is a member of ARVO’s Animals in Research Committee and participates on the WEAVR (Women in Eye and Vision Research) organizational committee. 

Nominated by: Vadim Arshavsky, PhD

It is my great pleasure to nominate Dr. Goldis Malek for representing RC in the Annual Meeting Program Committee. Goldis has been studying ocular cell biology since 1997 and has made a number of major contributions to our understanding of the retina/RPE interactions, particularly in regards to pathobiological processes characteristic of age-related macular degeneration. This includes introducing several powerful animal models that recapitulate key phenotypic features of this blinding disease. Most recently, she is been testing the therapeutic potential of targeting various nuclear receptors as possible treatments for both wet and dry age-related macular degeneration. As a fellow faculty member, I have had numerous occasions to hear Goldis’ presentations and discuss her work in great detail, which impressed on me that her appreciation of ocular cell biology is both broad and deep and, therefore, she will be an extremely productive Committee member. I should also add that Goldis has a sincere commitment to service, both at a departmental level and to the community of visual scientists at large. Goldis has had a number of occasions to serve on NIH study sections and other grant review panels. She is an editor of four scientific journals in the fields of vision and endocrinology. Currently, Goldis is the chair of ARVO’s Animals in Research Committee and an active participant of the WEAVR (Women in Eye and Vision Research). She also cares deeply about the success of the younger generation of vision researchers, which makes me feel confident that she will be fair and exercise good judgment in selecting presentations for ARVO talks. Based on these qualities and qualifications, I sincerely believe that Dr. Goldis Malek will be an outstanding Program Committee member.

Xiuqian Mu, MD, PhD, is currently an associate professor in the Departments of Ophthalmology and Biochemistry and the Neuroscience Program at the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY-Buffalo). Mu obtained his MD from Qingdao Medical College (now Qingdao University School of Medicine) and PhD in biochemistry and molecular biology from Peking Union Medical College in China. He subsequently received further training in molecular biology and developmental biology at the National Institutes of Health and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. He entered the field of retinal development when he joined the lab of William Klein at MD Anderson, first as a research associate and then as an instructor and research assistant professor.

He started his own lab as an assistant professor at SUNY-Buffalo in 2008 and was promoted to associate professor with tenure in 2015. Mu's major research interests are the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying the generation of the diverse retinal cell types during development, using the mouse as his research model. He has made major contributions to our understanding of the gene regulatory network controlling the formation of the retinal ganglion cells. Through his study, he has identified key transcription factors and uncovered the mechanisms of their functions during retinal cell differentiation using a combined approach of mouse genetics, genomics and bioinformatics. He has published more than 30 papers in high-tier, peer-reviewed journals, including PNAS, Journal of Neuroscience, Experimental Eye Research, Development, Nucleic Acids Research, Developmental Biology and Current Biology. While continuing his research along this direction, his current study is also expanding into in vitro differentiation of retinal neurons for therapeutic purposes. His research has been funded by the NEI/NIH, New York State, the Ziegler Foundation, the Glaucoma Foundation, the Whitehall Foundation and the BrightFocus Foundation. In addition, Mu has served as manuscript reviewer for many scientific and biomedical journals as well as grant reviewer for multiple funding agencies and as session moderator at previous ARVO Annual Meetings. 

Endorsed by: Steven Fliesler, PhD, FARVO

I am nominating myself to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Retinal Cell Biology (RC) Section of ARVO. Currently I am a tenured Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Biochemistry at the University at Buffalo (SUNY-Buffalo). I have been a member of ARVO since 2009, have attended ARVO annual meetings regularly, and have served twice as a poster session moderator.  My expertise is in the field of retinal development with a focus on the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying retinal cell fate specification. I have made major contributions to the current understanding of the gene regulatory network controlling retinal ganglion cell differentiation by identifying novel key regulators and uncovering the mechanisms of their functions, and have published extensively in this area.  In addition, I have reviewed numerous manuscripts pertinent to retinal cell biology for several major journals, including PNAS, Development, Developmental Biology, PLoS One, Molecular Vision, Developmental Dynamics, Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, and Experimental Eye Research, and have served on grant review panels for a variety of funding agencies.  I am eager to serve the RC Section and ARVO in general as a member of the AMPC, and offer the benefit of my expertise and experience to help ensure the high qualify of abstracts presented at the annual ARVO meetings.

James Fadool, PhD, is a tenured professor in the Department of Biological Science and the Graduate Program in Neuroscience at Florida State University. He has been a participating member of the Retinal Cell Biology Section of ARVO since 1992.

Fadool demonstrated an early interest in cell structure and function completing his senior project at Albion College on the ultrastructure of cilia. He received his PhD from Department of Zoology at Michigan State University, where he employed contemporary and state-of-the-art imaging methods to investigate the toxic side-effects of platinum-based anti-cancer agents. Fadool’s start in vision science began with his first postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Florida, investigating cell-cell interaction-dependent differentiation of Müller glial. Fadool was awarded an NEI/NIH NRSA to continue his training at Harvard University, where he joined a genetic screen in zebrafish to identify loci essential for visual system development. During this exciting and rapidly evolving period in zebrafish genetics, Fadool became one of the first to develop the technology for transposon-mediated transgenesis in a vertebrate.

Currently, Fadool’s research and training program utilizes the highly ordered photoreceptor mosaic in the zebrafish retina to identify genes essential for photoreceptor development, patterning and survival. His research group established transgenic and mutant lines of zebrafish as models of circuitry remodeling and photoreceptor regeneration. Fadool’s research program has received nearly continuous funding from the NEI/NIH, NSF and private foundations. As his colleagues in the zebrafish community know, Fadool generously shares the lines of zebrafish, antibodies and molecular resources resulting from his work.

Fadool’s commitment to the vision community is most evident through his years of service and substantial outreach activities. He has worked alongside many of our colleagues as a member or chair of numerous NIH study sections and foundation panels including Biology and Diseases of the Posterior Eye (BDPE) and Biology of the Visual System (BVS). Fadool has organized meetings, minisymposia, and sessions for ARVO, FASEB and the Society for Developmental Biology. Fadool serves on the editorial boards for Molecular Vision, Developmental Dynamics and BMC Ophthalmology. As a faculty member for the courses Fundamental Issues in Vision Research and Zebrafish Development and Genetics at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Fadool has introduced a generation of our graduate students and postdoctoral scientists to the zebrafish as a model organism for retinal research.

Fadool is dedicated to expanding opportunities to a broader slate of students through mentoring and programs that promote early exposure to research experiences. He is a member of advisory panels for junior faculty at liberal arts colleges, regional universities and HBCUs that identify internal mechanisms, partnerships and extramural funding to strengthen the infrastructure for basic, clinical and translational research and foster an environment for faculty and students' success. Fadool is a co-advisor to the local chapter of BBB National Biology Honor Society and the local pre-optometry club, providing opportunities for students in leadership and creative activities.

Nominated by: Peter Hitchcock, PhD

It is my pleasure to nominate James M Fadool, PhD, to the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Retinal Cell Biology section of ARVO. Dr. Fadool is currently Professor of Biological Sciences at Florida State University. Dr. Fadool is a well-known vision scientist and has been a participating member of RC since the beginning of his postdoctoral fellowship in 1992. Dr. Fadool's research program employs an array of classical and state-of-the-art genetic manipulations and imaging methods to investigate photoreceptor structure and development, Muller glia, stem cells and regeneration, genetic models of disease and retinal circuitry – all areas central to the cell biology of the retina. In addition, Dr. Fadool has committed considerable time and energy to the peer review process. His expertise, thoughtfulness and ability to work with others are exemplified by significant service as a member and chair of NIH study sections, including BDPE and BVS, NIH site visits and chair of a special emphasis panel associated with the NEI’s Audacious Goals Initiative. Dr. Fadool has organized and chaired sessions for ARVO and FASEB, and regional meetings for the Society for Developmental Biology.

The breadth of Dr. Fadool's research expertise and his service to the scientific and vision research communities make him an ideal candidate for the RC AMPC.

Michael Zuber, PhD received his degree in Biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1995, followed by postdoctoral training in retinal developmental neurobiology at both the University of California at San Diego and the University of Cambridge, England with C. Holt and WilliamHarris. He joined the research faculty in the Departments of Ophthalmology, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, and Neuroscience & Physiology at SUNY Upstate Medical University in 2005. He was promoted to associate professor with tenure in 2013. Zuber’s laboratory studies the development, degeneration and regeneration of the retina using both amphibian and rodent models. Zuber’s research originally focused on identification of the cellular and molecular mechanisms driving formation of the eye field, which is the embryonic origin of the retina.

This work led to the discovery of signaling systems required for retina formation. He initially characterized, and continues to investigate, the eye field transcription factors — the expression of which is now considered de facto evidence for generation of retinal stem/progenitor cells. Zuber’s more recent work has investigated the cellular changes that follow rod photoreceptor death resulting in progressive retinal degeneration and how these changes can activate and/or inhibit in vivo retinal regeneration. In addition to directing an active research lab, Zuber has provided support for his university.

He served on the Strategic Planning for Strengthening Research, as well as Research Steering Committees, charged with designing and implementing a university-wide strategic plan for promoting excellence in research. He was a founding member of the Postdoctoral Affairs Steering Committee, which established the Upstate Office of Postdoctoral Affairs charged with advancing the training of postdoctoral appointees for career developmental as scientific professionals. Zuber has reviewed grant applications for numerous NIH, NSF and national and international foundation review panels, and he has reviewed manuscripts for more than 15 different journals. Zuber enjoys an international reputation as a developmental neurobiologist and is actively sought out for collaborative work.

Nominated by: William Brunken, PhD

I am excited to nominate Michael Zuber, PhD, to serve on the Retinal Cell Biology Section of the Annual Meeting Program Committee. Dr. Zuber is currently Associate Professor of Ophthalmology, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, and Neuroscience and Physiology at Upstate Medical University and has been a member of the Retinal Cell Biology section since 2006. Dr. Zuber is a recognized expert in the fields of retinal development, retinal stem cells and regeneration of the visual system, making him an excellent selection for the RCB section committee. During his post-doctoral research with Christine Holt and William Harris in California, and then, Cambridge England, Dr. Zuber identified key elements of the genetic regulatory network that leads to eye specification.  In his own laboratory, Dr. Zuber has continued these studies on the early regulation of retinal and indeed neural fates.  He has an encyclopedic knowledge of retina development and innovative approaches to retinal regeneration.  Mike has substantial experience reviewing both grant applications and manuscripts and has developed a strong reputation as a skilled mentor for pre and post-doctoral students. He has a well-established national and international reputation, not only for his science but also for his collegial and collaborative approach. As a former chair of the RC section of the AMPC, it is my opinion, that Mike would be an ideal addition to the committee.

RE Section — non U.S.

Mineo Kondo, MD, PhD, FARVO, graduated from Kanazawa University School of Medicine in 1991 and received his doctoral degree in ophthalmology from Nagoya University in 2007. From 1999 - 2001 he undertook a research fellowship at Michigan University in Ann Arbor, and he joined the faculty in the Department of Ophthalmology at Nagoya University in 2001. Prof. Kondo is currently a professor of ophthalmology at Mie University School of Medicine in Mie, Japan.

He is a very active clinician-scientist who has continuously published original experimental and clinical studies on the retina and macula. His special interest is the physiology of the retina in normal and diseased eyes, and he has used electrophysiological, morphological and molecular biological techniques to diagnose and characterize eyes with retinal diseases. In the 1990s, he succeeded in applying multifocal ERGs to patients with retinal diseases, and he has published many papers on the use of this technique. At the same time, he has also spent a considerable amount of time in the laboratory performing functional analysis of the ERGs in animal models of retinal diseases. In 2009, he generated a rhodopsin P347L transgenic (Tg) rabbit, a model of retinitis pigmentosa. Pathological alterations of this Tg rabbits were very similar to those reported in human patients with retinitis pigmentosa. This Tg rabbits serve as a useful animal model with large eyes, which can be used to study the pathophysiology of RP and develop novel treatments. Recently, he discovered that TRPM1, a transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 1, is one of the autoantigens targeted by autoantibodies in some patients with melanoma-associated retinopathy (MAR) associated with retinal ON bipolar cell dysfunction. He has more than 170 peer-reviewed publications (impact factor, over 400) including those published in PNAS, J Neurosci, Nat Genet, and Nat Neurosci.

Kondo has reviewed manuscripts for over 10 different journals, and he currently serves on the editorial board of four scientific journals; Translational Vision Science and Technology (associate editor), Documenta Ophthalmologica (associate ditor), Current Eye Research, and Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology.

Nominated by: Paul Sieving, MD, PhD, FARVO

It is my pleasure to nominate Mineo Kondo, MD, PhD,to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee (AMPC) for the Retina section of ARVO. Dr. Kondo is currently Professor of Ophthalmology at Mie University Graduate School of Medicine and a long-time member of the Retina section. He is also an ARVO Silver Fellow. Dr. Kondo is a recognized expert in the fields of pathophysiology of animal models and human retinal diseases. His studies are of the highest quality, and they have greatly advanced our understanding of retinal diseases, which make him an excellent match to the current needs of the committee. He has more than 170 peer-reviewed publications (impact factor, over 400) including those published in PNAS, J Neurosci, Nat Genet, and Nat Neurosci. In addition, Dr. Kondo is an editor of four scientific journals; Translational Vision Science and Technology (Associate Editor), Documenta Ophthalmologica (Associate Editor),Current Eye Research, and Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology.  He is well-respected and well-liked by his colleagues around the world. I firmly believe he will continue to have a great impact in the research of the retina and ophthalmology.For this reason, I respectfully recommend Dr. Kondo as a new member of Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Retina section of ARVO without any reservation.  

Marten Brelen, BMBCh, FRCOphth, PhD, received his preclinical medical degree (MA) from Cambridge University where he graduated with 1st class honors in 1998 followed by his medical degree (BMBCh) from Oxford University in 2001. He spent four years in full-time research at the University of Louvain in Belgium, which led to the degree of PhD in Biomedical Sciences. His PhD thesis is entitled, "An Optic Nerve Approach for the Visual Prosthesis." Clinically, Brelén is fellowship trained at the Bristol Eye Hospital (UK) in vitreoretinal surgery and he is a fellow of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists UK (London).

Brelén joined the department of ophthalmology and visual sciences at the Chinese University of Hong Kong two years ago and is currently the head of retina service at the Chinese University of Hong Kong Eye Centre and the team head for the vitreoretinal service at Prince of Wales Hospital. He is the lead coordinator of the clinical fellowship program for vitreoretinal training and the director of the Pao So Kok Macular Disease Treatment and Research Centre. He is also a visiting professor at the Joint Shantou International Eye Centre in Shantou, China.

His main research interests are in electrodiagnostics and more specifically the development of new ERG recording techniques, visual prosthesis research and retinal imaging. Within clinical research, Brelén is involved in clinical trials for age related macular degeneration, diabetic macular oedema and retinal vein occlusions. Brelén is also involved in medical instrumentation research and is currently developing new surgical instruments,as well as diagnostic equipment. He remains actively involved in the setting up and running of pharmaceutical sponsored clinical trials.

Brelén has reviewed previous grant applications, reviewed articles for numerous international peer reviewed journals, has been on the thesis review panel for students at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and has supervised research projects for masters students. Brelén currently serves on the editorial board of the Asia Pacific Journal of Ophthalmology.

Endorsed by: Calvin Pang, Dphil

I would like to nominate myself to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the RE (non-US) section of ARVO. I am currently an assistant professor at the department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. I am the clinical lead for the vitreoretinal service at the Chinese University of Hong Kong Eye Centre and the director of the Pao So Kok Macular Disease Treatment and Research Centre. I have been attending the annual ARVO meeting since 2005 and have also previously published in IOVS. I also have experience in organising sessions at large scientific meetings having previously been on the organising committees for the International Symposium of Ophthalmology in Hong Kong 2014 and World Ophthalmology Congress 2016. I have a research interest in medical and surgical retina and am currently on the editorial board of the Asia Pacific Journal of Ophthalmology.

Jens Folke Kiilgaard, MD, PhD received his degree in medicine from the University of Copenhagen in 1995 followed by a PhD degree on Bruch’s membrane in 2002 from University of Copenhagen. He then specialized in ophthalmology and did a vitreo-retinal Fellowship at Copenhagen University Hospital, Glostrup in 2006. In 2010, he became head of ocular oncology and joined the faculty in the Department of Ophthalmology at the University of Copenhagen. Jens Kiilgaard has been active within basic research, clinical research and research in education of upcoming ophthalmic surgeons.

The basic research has primarily focused on retinal function in the detached or injured retina in the porcine animal model. Originally the goal was to replace the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), but the recent work has focused on RPE/photoreceptor interaction and the effect on multifocal Electro-Retino-Graphy (mfERG).

The clinical research has focused on the treatment and prognostication in uveal melanoma and epidemiological studies on retinal detachment. As senior consultant, responsible for the training of residents in ophthalmology, he has participated in evaluating virtual reality simulation as educational tool in surgical training. In addition to his clinical work, Jens Kiilgaard provides administrative support to his department and school. Jens Kiilgaard has reviewed manuscripts for nearly 10 different journals, and currently serves as associate editor for Acta Ophthalmologica.

Nominated by: Morten de la Cour, MD

It is my pleasure to nominate Jens Folke Kiilgaard, MD, PhD, to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Retina (RE) section of ARVO. Jens Kiilgaard is currently Associate Research Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark and a long-time member of the Retina section. Jens Folke Kiilgaard is a recognized vitreo-retinal surgeon with special interests in retinal transplantation, retinal progenitor cells, sub-retinal surgery and epidemiology of retinal diseases, which make him an excellent match to the current needs of the committee. In addition, Jens Kiilgaard has a broad understanding of the retina and has substantial experience as a reviewer of grant applications and manuscripts. He is well-respected and well-liked by his colleagues around the world. He will be a first-rate addition to the committee.

RE Section — U.S.

Stephen Russell, MD, FARVO, is the Schrage Professor for Macular Degeneration Research at the University of Iowa and Wynn Institute for Vision Research. His first ARVO abstract was published in 1985 and led to the publication corneal hydration dynamics in J. Physiology (London). He has published basic research and translational studies characterizing epiretinal membranes and the vitreoretinal interface, the composition of drusen, genetics of age-related macular degeneration and gene therapy. As an active vitreoretinal surgeon, he has also served as PI for numerous clinical trials, most recently collaborating with [need first names] Maguire and Bennett to evaluate the therapeutic potential of voretigene neparvovec for RPE65-associated LCA. He has served as member and chair of the AAO Self-Assessment Committee, wrote or edited thousands of question for continuing education, and edited Provision 5.

Nominated by: Julia Haller, MD, FARVO

It is my great pleasure to nominate Steve Russell, MD, to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Retina (RE) section of ARVO. Dr. Russell is currently Schrage Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Iowa and a long-time member of the RE section. He is a recognized expert in the fields of gene therapy, age-related macular degeneration, imaging, diabetic retinopathy, and retinal surgery; his broad areas of expertise make him an excellent match to the current needs of the committee. He has decades of experience as a reviewer of manuscripts, journal editorships, and as a leader in organizations such as the American Academy of Ophthalmology. He is well-respected and well-liked by his colleagues around the world. He will be an immense asset to the committee. 

VI Section

Shrikant Bharadwaj, PhD, completed his undergraduate degree in optometry from the Elite School of Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Chennai and a PhD in Vision Science from the University of California Berkeley School of Optometry. After completing his postdoctoral training in Vision Science at the Indiana University School of Optometry, Bharadwaj returned to the L V Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI) in Hyderabad as a DBT Ramalingaswami Fellow in 2009. Bharadwaj has since then established the Visual Optics research laboratory at LVPEI with the overall agenda of understanding how the optics of the eye influences spatial vision and depth vision.

Bharadwaj uses a combination of experimental, behavioral and computational techniques to address this research agenda. His laboratory actively publishes research work in international peer reviewed vision science journals and the research work is generously supported by extramural grants from the Department of Science and Technology and Department of Bio-Technology and from the optical industry (Abbott Medical Optics, Groningen, The Netherlands). Bharadwaj also serves on the editorial board of Nature Scientific Reports and Optometry and Vision Science.

In addition to his research work, Bharadwaj also serves as director of the Brien Holden Institute of Optometry and Vision Sciences, L V Prasad Eye Institute and also teaches at the institute’s Bausch & Lomb School of Optometry.

Nominated by: Lisa Ostrin, OD, PhD, FARVO

It is with great pleasure that I nominate Dr. Shrikant Bharadwaj as a candidate for the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Visual Psychophysics and Physiological Optics section (VI).

Dr. Bharadwaj has been a member of ARVO in the VI section for 15 years. He is the Director of the Brien Holden Institute of Optometry and Vision Science at the LV Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI) in Hyderabad, India. In addition to serving as a director, he established the Visual Optics research laboratory at LVPEI. His research focus is on understanding how the optics of the eye influence spatial vision and depth vision, using a combination of experimental, behavioral, and computational techniques. Being a clinician and vision researcher, Dr. Bharadwaj has a broad understanding of visual performance and optical quality, with a background in accommodation and binocular vision.

Dr. Bharadwaj has demonstrated dedication to service and teaching throughout his career. He serves on the editorial board for Scientific Reports, and as a topical editor for OVS. He received an Elsevier award for top 50 reviewers for Vision Research. He teaches binocular vision, visual perception and pediatric optometry at LVPEI. These roles contribute to the expertise that will serve him well as an AMPC member for the VI section.

I am confident that Dr. Bharadwaj will serve ARVO and the AMPC with the commitment to the vision research field that I have observed in my interactions with him. I enthusiastically recommend Dr. Shrikant Bharadwaj as a candidate for the VI Section of the Annual Meeting Program Committee (AMPC).

Jennifer Hunter, PhD is an assistant professor of ophthalmology at the University of Rochester. She holds secondary appointments with the Center for Visual Science and Biomedical Engineering. She received her PhD in physics and vision Science from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada in 2007. Her graduate work focused of the optical quality of the eye and it’s relation to presbyopia corrections and emmetropization.

Hunter then pursued postdoctoral training in the field of adaptive optics retinal imaging at the University of Rochester. Hunter’s current research focuses on the mechanisms of light-induced retinal damage and the development of non-invasive fluorescence imaging techniques to study retinal function in healthy and diseased eyes using adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopes. Hunter’s lab has developed two-photon excited fluorescence imaging of the living eye to non-invasively observe the ganglion cell mosaic and image visual function in photoreceptors.

Hunter is a leading expert in light safety in the field of ophthalmic imaging, co-authoring multiple papers on photochemical damage from visible light. By sitting on several committees of the American National Standards Institute, Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers, she has influenced revisions to the standard to enhance light safety for ophthalmology and optometry patients.

Hunter has performed grant reviews for NIH and several other international funding agencies. She is director for the Imaging Module of the Center for Visual Science’s NIH core grant. Hunter recently completed a three-year elected term as chair of the Vision and Color Division of the Optical Society (OSA). In this role, she led the organization of the scientific programs for the OSA Fall Vision Meetings from 2014 - 2016.

Nominated by: Ann Elsner, PhD, FARVO

It is my pleasure to nominate Jennifer J. Hunter, PhD, to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Visual Psychophysics/Physiological Optics (VI) section of ARVO. Dr. Hunter Doe is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Ophthalmology and Department of Biomedical Engineering the University of Rochester. Dr. Hunter is a recognized expert in the fields of optics and retinal imaging, with considerable experience in anterior segment optics as well. This broad experience and expertise in optics match well to the current needs of the committee. She is an expert in light safety, sitting on the ANSI standards board for the US. In addition, Dr. Hunter has considerable experience in organizing scientific meetings, having served in a number of relevant roles in the Optical Society of America, such as Chair for the Vision and Color Division. She has substantial experience as a reviewer of grant applications and manuscripts, which is important in reviewing abstracts. She is known for her mentoring of young scientists. She is well-respected and well-liked by her colleagues around the world. She will be a first-rate addition to the committee.

VN Section

Jan Kremers, PhD, received his master’s degree in biology from the University of Wageningen (the Netherlands) in 1984 and his PhD from the University of Utrecht (the Netherlands) in 1989. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Max-Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen (Germany). From 1992 until 2003 he was lab-head at the University of Tübingen Eye Hospital (Germany). Between 1999 and 2003 he was Heisenberg fellow of the German Research Council. From 2003 until 2005 he was lab-head at Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research in Basel (Switzerland) and Strasbourg (France). 2006 and 2007 he was fellow of the Hertie Foundation in the Excellence Program for Neuroscience. Currently, he is professor for experimental ophthalmology at the University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). He is honorary professor visual neuroscience at the University of Bradford (UK) and recipient of a fellowship from the Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation in Brisbane (Australia).

Kremers’ scientific interest is in the visual information processing in the healthy and diseased retina and the relationship with visual perception. Currently, he and his group mainly perform non-invasive electrophysiological recordings (electroretinography; visual evoked potentials) and psychophysical measurements in human subjects (healthy subjects and different patient groups — with an emphasis on glaucoma) and in animals (including animal models for human retinal disorders). He has a thorough background in retinal recordings from non-human primates. He collaborates intensively with colleagues in the U.K., U.S., Australia and Brazil.

Kremers is author of 128 publications in peer reviewed journals. He edited three books (including The Primate Visual System in 2005 and Human Color Vision in 2016). He received grant support from the German Research Council (DFG), the German Ministry of Education and Research, The European Commission, the Australian Research Council and several institutions in Brazil (FAPESP, CAPES, CNPq). Currently, he is member of the Board of Directors of the International Color Vision Society (ICVS) and is organizer of the 2017 biannual meeting of the ICVS. He is editorial board member of Documenta Ophthalmologica and Vision and was reviewer for about 30 journals (including IOVS, JOV and TVST) and for grant organizations in different European countries and in the U.S.

Kremers was supervisor of about 20 PhD students and is involved in several graduate and post-graduate training programs.

Nominated by: Ulrike Grunert, PhD

It is my pleasure to nominate Jan Kremers, PhD, to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee for the Visual Neuroscience section of ARVO. Dr. Kremers is currently Professor of Experimental Ophthalmology at the Ophthalmology Department of the University Hospital Erlangen and a long-time member of the Visual Neuroscience section. Dr. Kremers is a recognized expert in the fields of retinal physiology and pathophysiology, electroretinography, and color vision, which make him an excellent match to the current needs of the committee. In addition, Dr. Kremers has a broad understanding of the retina and has substantial experience as a reviewer of grant applications and manuscripts. He is well-respected and well-liked by his colleagues around the world. He will be a very valuable addition to the committee.

Chi Luu, PhD, completed a PhD in visual neuroscience in 1999 and then undertook postdoctoral training in visual psychophysics and electrophysiology. In 2000, he became a member of ARVO. In 2001, he moved to Singapore for a two-year retinal research fellowship at the Singapore Eye Research Institute (SERI), where he was appointed as a research scientist in 2003. He also had a clinical appointment as a clinical electrophysiologist at the Singapore National Eye Centre, where he established and ran the electro-diagnostic service from 2003 – 2008. This was the first International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision (ISCEV) Standard electrophysiology laboratory in Asia. He also established a clinical and experimental electrophysiology laboratory in SERI and actively conducted research studies using electrophysiology of various aspects of the visual system and ocular diseases, which led him winning a prestigious award in visual electrophysiology from the Society for the Advancement of Neuro-ophthalmological Research (Germany) and ISCEV. He was promoted to assistant professor of ophthalmology at the National University of Singapore in 2006. In 2008, he was invited to return to Melbourne to take up a senior research scientist position at the Centre for Eye Research Australia and Department of Ophthalmology, University of Melbourne to initiate the pre-clinical, clinical and surgical research programs for the bionic eye project, which subsequently received a $50 million funding from the Australian Research Council in 2010. In 2015, Luu was promoted to associate professor of ophthalmology at the University of Melbourne. His current research interests include age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, other retinal degenerations, myopia, retinal prosthesis, neuroprotection and stem cell research.

Chi is a productive researcher with over 110 peer-reviewed publications, six book chapters and three international patents. Many of his publications are related to electrophysiological studies in humans and animal models of visual disorders. He is also a renowned educator in clinical electrophysiology. He conducts lectures, seminars, workshops and hands-on training related to clinical and animal electrophysiology to clinicians and researchers at various hospitals and organizations in Australia and Asia. He reviews manuscripts for several leading ophthalmic and visual science journals. He has also been invited to review grants for government agencies in Australia and Asia. He has been a member of scientific committee of several international clinical ophthalmology and vision science conferences including the Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision (2008 and 2010) and Asia-ARVO (2011).

Nominated by: Laura Frishman, PhD

I am pleased to nominate Chi D. Luu, PhD to serve on the Annual Meeting Program Committee (AMPC) for the Visual Neuroscience (VN) section of ARVO. Dr. Luu is currently an Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Melbourne, and he heads the clinical psychophysics and electrophysiology laboratories at the Center for Eye Research Australia. Dr. Luu has broad interests in retinal function and physiology, as well as in translation of basic research findings to the clinic. His numerous publications include basic, clinical and translational investigations of pathophysiology of retinal diseases such as macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and inherited retinal degenerations, as well as improvements in the use of diagnostic and monitoring tools such as electro diagnostic testing. In related work, he has been assessing the utility of bionic devices for blindness. Dr. Luu has been a member of ARVO since 2000 and he has  served on several scientific committees for international meetings, including Asia ARVO, Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision and a SERI ARVO meeting. He has reviewed grant applications for national agencies in Australia, Hong Kong and Singapore and he frequently reviews manuscripts for leading eye research journals including IOVS. He is well-respected by his co-workers, and numerous collaborators around the world. Dr. Luu’s broad interests and expertise in assessing normal, abnormal and restored vision would complement the expertise of the existing VN AMPC members and be an excellent addition to ensure future exciting sessions on new findings in basic and translational visual neuroscience.

For any inquiries, please contact Stephen Willie.

 
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